Tag Archives: Sword Art Online

Otakusphere Weekly Episode #32: Vampire Investment Tips

This time around, Sword Art Online gets us talking about the future of warfare, we investigate the possible deeper meaning of Mai’s bunny suit in Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai, and I’m getting surprisingly invested in Between Sea and Sky, considering the fact that I still think it’s dumb and it will never stop being dumb in general. In addition, we childishly yell at Kyoto Animation for having the audacity to make a silly archery show instead of Miss Kobayashi’s Dragon Maid Season 2/ Sound Euphonium Season 3/literally anything else, and speculate about Sophie Twilight’s financial situation.

We didn’t end up doing Listener Questions this week, because uh…I forgot. We’ll do it next time, for sure, so if you have any more questions, let us know in the comments.

Also, Paw Patrol is best show and Skye is absolutely BEST GIRL:

Yes mai waifu is a Cocker Spaniel/Poodle mix who flies helicopters, get your own.

Sword Art Online Alicization: Episode 5

Karen:

Since this episode focuses on Asuna, this seems like a good time to take a step back and look at what a cool character she’s become. During the Aincrad arc, she was an immature kid– which was totally understandable, since she was a sheltered teenager drawn into something huge that she couldn’t have anticipated. Nevertheless, she did seem a little whiny and self-centered to begin with. But she’s grown to the point where, by the time of Mother’s Rosario, she not only felt like an adult, but she essentially became co-protagonists with Kirito. That set-up pays dividends here, where the whole episode can be Kirito-free and it never really feels like we’re missing out on the “main” character.

She also functions similar to Kirito now, using the same kind of hands-on approach to problem solving. Part of that is because she hasn’t been his girlfriend for years without learning anything, and part of that just goes to show why they work so well as a couple to begin with. They aren’t together for only superficial reasons; they both have an almost pathological need to right injustices. On a more basic note, we now get Hero! Asuna rescuing Damsel! Kirito, and that’s a nice change of pace.

In terms of the larger story with Rath, I’m wondering about Kirito’s overall significance to the Underworld project. Obviously Rath wants Kirito’s consciousness in there because they expect his presence will cause the AI to grow in a certain way, but does it necessarily have to be Kirito in that role? I think it’s less that Kirito has super-special soul juice or whatever, and more that he just happens to be the person who was integrated into the system first, so Eugeo and Alice have memories of him. If it turns out they need Kirito because he is just that special of a snowflake, I’m going to be a little disappointed.

It was nice to see everyone working together as a team; even something as simple as Klein driving Asuna around in his car shows that in the real world, they all have different roles and can contribute in different ways. Considering one of their team members is a nigh-omnipotent AI, things feel a little bit stacked in their favor, but I guess it’s a little bit late to be complaining about that? It just goes to show, if you ever find a down-on-her-luck orphan, be nice to her: she may turn out to be a Goddess AI who can hack government databases for you! Always a useful tool to have in one’s back pocket.

I may be the only one here who doesn’t care what happened to Kirito’s assailant. Until the show gives me reason to believe otherwise, I’m going to assume 1)Asuna called the police and 2)he’s in jail; the end.

Finally, I’m interested in the fact that Kayaba Akihito had a lover; they may have revealed that before, but this is the first time I remember it coming up. It would be easy to assume that Akihito was an angry loner who was lashing out at society, but the show has always portrayed him as more nuanced than that; granted, the dude straight-up murdered 4,000 people and viewers should always keep that in mind, but I appreciate what an interesting character he is regardless. It’s interesting how he, and his dream of an imaginary castle in the sky, continue to affect the world of SAO even years after his death.

My early reservations about this season have pretty much evaporated by now; now I’m interested to see how the Underworld plot is going to interface with Asuna’s plot. I don’t see any reason why Asuna couldn’t just visit Underworld in a dive, but in some ways, it might be more interesting if she remained separated from Kirito and had to fight her battle on a different front. We shall see.

LB:

Originally, I enjoyed this episode until the last five minutes or so– though, now that more has been explained to me, I’m finding myself coming around on it.

The big issue I had when I first watched this episode was that at the very end of the episode, Asuna was able to fool top-level security checks, multiple times mind you, simply by having Yui switch the database profile photo with hers. That seemed WAY too easy for me to buy at first, but since I’ve watched this episode I’ve been told by multiple people that this is a perfectly viable way of hacking the system and it’s made even more plausible due to the fact that Yui is like a God-level AI. So yeah, never mind I guess?

Other than that, I really liked that we’re getting a break from Underworld to see what everyone else is up to. The lingering question in my mind, however, is all about the initial attack from the Laughing Coffin member that put Kirito in a coma. Was that attack pre-meditated by RATH in order to get a great test subject? Or was it just one big happy coincidence? That’s an answer that I’d really like to have about now but I’m guessing that if we ever do find out the answer, it’s not going to be for quite a while. *sighs*

Lifesong:

Japanese military is not what I expected when I asked to see the outside world, but it makes enough sense to me. I don’t know how well known the idea of an AI arms race is for most people. If you’ve never heard that term, take a moment to google it. It fits Sword Art Online and might give you some interesting thoughts to chew on.

Alicization appears to be Japan’s answer to an AI arms race. It brings a dozen new questions to the table, like what does Japan’s military want to do with these AIs? I’ve been speculating that Underworld is some sort of immortality project. Now that I know the government is behind it, that’s only one of many possibilities. Immortality doesn’t seem to be the focus.

For now I have more questions than answers about Japan’s AI goals. I can’t speculate past the political and economic powers of developing an advanced AI. It’s an interesting topic. Its inclusion elevates my curiosity for more world building. How do the rules the AI in Underworld live by fit into the larger goal of this military project?

The military twist is cool, but the real MVP this week is Asuna. Not only did Asuna manage to hack a Japanese government database with the help of her own AI, she located and infiltrated the naval base holding Kirito faster than he figured out how to cut down a tree! Who’s the OP one now?

Episode 5’s portrayal of hacking was fantastic. Step 1: Change the picture in a database. Step 2: Walk in and pretend like you belong until you do your thing. I appreciate how down to earth that is. No fancy pseudo-science hacking magic, just some plain old BSing.

Speaking of BSing… Whatever happened to the guy who stabbed Kirito? The story hasn’t acknowledged his existence beyond what he did in episode one. Did Asuna go into berserker mode and beat him senseless? Did that stab wound from Kirito somehow take him out? Maybe a wild AR Pokemon hacked into his brain and put him into sleep mode until the plot remembers his relevance? I don’t need that explained now, but it feels odd that it wasn’t mentioned.

I felt like this episode did a great job of bridging Kirito’s stabbing and catching us up with Asuna and friends. I wonder if Asuna will be able to jump into Underworld? But I need more information to speculate the purpose of Underworld. Developing AI makes sense, but why is Kirito needed? Maybe that’s Kikuoka’s whim more so than anything else? The episode title for next week leads me to believe we will get some more answers ASAP. I can speculate more after that.

Otakusphere (not) Weekly Episode #31: The Asuna Infiltration

Another week, another episode spent talking about seasonal anime. LB and I actually had some other things to discuss; unfortunately, silly Lifesong is busy playing video games instead of stuffing his face with anime and LNs. What’s up with that? How dare he take care of his mental health at the expense of his otaku street cred? Newb.

Now that we’re getting used to using this new format, there are some things to be aware of. Some of you have already noticed, but the episodes sometimes go up on Youtube a little while before I have a chance to make a post for them. So if you want to listen to new episodes ASAP, you can subscribe on Youtube. However, they never go up more than maybe a day earlier, so it’s not really a big deal either way.

Got any questions for us? Feel free to let us know in the comments. If we get some good questions, maybe we’ll take a break from seasonal chatting one of these days and do a good old-fashioned listener questions episode. Actually, that sounds fun, so if you guys don’t give us any good questions, I’ll probably just make up some.

Sword Art Online Alicization, Episode 4

LB:

Finally!

That’s all I could say to myself as I watched the latest episode of SAO. Finally we got the action sequences that fans have come to expect from this series, finally we saw the damn Demon Tree felled, and finally, we saw our heroes embark on what I’m certain will be an epic journey. At least it had better be, or else I’m going to be one unhappy puppy. I quite liked this episode since it moved the story along so strongly. Things actually happened in this episode which made me want to pay attention to all the things.

There are still a ton of questions that need to be answered (many of which were originally raised by the opening animation rather than the episodes themselves, which is strange). My prediction is that eventually, we’re going to get to the big city and learn that Alice isn’t dead but has actually been drafted into the Integrity Knights. I have no idea what is going to happen beyond that (and I don’t even know if I’m correct or not) but I know that for the first time in a couple of weeks, I’m genuinely excited to find out.

Karen:

Wow, this episode did everything but give you a mug of hot cocoa and a backrub after it was over. A cool fight, everyone now remembers the stuff from episode one, significant plot advancement, and the demise of The Tree That Could Not Be Cut? What more could you ask for?

I do have a bit of a problem with reminding myself that the violence is not “real”– that is, even though they’re in a very realistic virtual world and Kirito feels pain, they’re still not in reality. I kept thinking during the fight that Kirito shouldn’t be able to take as much punishment as he was taking and still be able to keep fighting at full strength, but when you remember that it’s a virtual world, it makes sense; in most games, as long as you have 1 HP, you can function as though you’re perfectly healthy. Kirito may have been down to about 250 HP out of 1128 or something, but he didn’t die, so he was still functional.

We know from Ordinal Scale that Kirito is limited in Augmented Reality compared to full VR, so it makes sense that his battle performance in this setting is that of his video game avatar, since this is a full-dive situation. However, the fact that he has such detailed sensory input makes it more akin to AR than his previous VR fighting experience, and I hope that’s something that the show explores in more depth.

On the subject of the battle, that was some quality fight choreography and animation. It’s easier to forgive the talkiness of the last two episodes knowing that the show had such an ambitious action scene coming. Now, after this season, I could do with never seeing any frickin’ goblins ever again, but if I have to see goblins get beat up, this is the kind of style I want to see it in.

One thing that I found interesting was that Eugeo remembered Kirito when he was on the brink of death. The implication is that Artificial Fluctlights have the same “life flashing before my eyes” experience that real people do when they’re approaching death. If Eugeo’s memories of the Kirito of his childhood were overwritten by the System (which appears to have been the case), this is another example of the human soul overpowering computer programming. We saw this as far back as Aincrad, when Asuna was able to shake off a status effect through sheer force of will to save Kirito, so this is something that’s always been part of the show, for better or for worse. In fact, I wonder if this arc is going to take that aspect of the original SAO story (which many viewers saw as a weakness), and fully develop it.

Of course, there’s a danger of an overly optimistic/Care Bears sort of message here, like “not even computer programming is powerful enough to overcome the will of the HUMAN SOUL!!!!!” but I trust Reki Kawahara (at least at this point in time) to be a little more nuanced than that with his writing. I think the struggle of the Artificial Fluctlights to gain control of their lives is going to end up being more complicated than “Believe in yourself,” or rather “Believe in the computer code that makes up your soul!”

Otherwise, it was interesting to see how the villagers reacted to the unexpected felling of the Demon Tree. I thought they’d be scared of change, but for them, the task of evaluating anything has been outsourced to the Taboo Index, so it doesn’t even occur to them to be scared of change. I mean, if cutting the Demon Tree down a few hundred years early was a bad thing, it would have said in the Taboo Index “don’t cut down the Demon Tree early,” right? I’m interested in seeing more about how judgement and morality works in this world where all their rules are put down in black and white.

Yes it is obviously similar to real-life religion, but different in the sense that there’s no possibility for dissent. Every text-based religion (that I’m aware of, anyway), has it’s own disagreements in regard to interpretation, but as far as we can tell, there are no Rabbis arguing over the true meaning of the Taboo Index; it’s simply taken completely at face value. I wonder what it says about me that in an episode devoted mostly to hacking the limbs off of goblins, my main takeaway is “Ooooh, it’s like the age of the Great Rabbis without Talmudic Commentary!”, but whatever; I’m enjoying myself.

Lifesong:

Episode four wrapped up the “leaving home” stage of Eugeo’s adventure in style. The goblin fight was fantastic. The ebb and flow of Kirito crossing swords with the goblin leader and his hoard made every hit exciting. And hey, Eugeo is actually important after all. He may have almost died, but in the scheme of tragic Sword Art Online moments? It felt good to see him make it through the fight.

The hook for Alicization is finally in full bloom, and now that it is I’m excited to see where it goes. Sword Art Online has had moments in the past where it felt like an adventure, but never like this. It’s given supporting characters important roles, but again, not quite like this. Eugeo is the hero and Kirito is taking on the role of mentor.  It’s neat to see SAO breaking away from the new-heroine-of-the-week style if only in a small way.

The way Underworld is hyper realistic in tangible sensation, but still gamey at it’s core is interesting to me. Kirito’s injuries during the goblin fight are a new kind of problem for him because of the pain. Ultimately the injury isn’t such a big deal; same for Eugeo. He takes a hit that should kill him and some durability sharing fixes the issue. As realistic as it all feels, this world runs on numbers in the end.

Now that Kirito and Eugeo have launched their adventure, I want to see things from Asuna’s perspective. I hope we get to see more of what’s going on outside of this virtual world. The timing is appropriate; Kirito and Eugeo’s adventure is off to a strong start. Now please tell me why Kirito is stuck in Underworld. Asuna did promise to follow Kirito anywhere. She also knew a whole lot about the origins of Alice in Wonderland. Tragic tone setting or subtle foreshadowing? I’m not sure yet.

Perhaps the most satisfying element of this whole episode was the end of our dear friend, the Demon Tree. I didn’t realize how much I wanted that thing gone until I felt like standing up to cheer when Kirito finally landed a good hit on it. The story even gave Eugeo the role of finishing it off. It was his task, and he handled it.

I know it’s a popular thing to act like SAO’s storytelling hasn’t improved since the Fairy Dance arc. I disagree, but will admit Gun Gale Online and Mother’s Rosario were both far from the death game promised in Aincrad. I can argue till I’m blue in the face that even SAO’s worst arc still hits good emotional notes, but… that doesn’t and won’t make it what people wanted or expected from the series.

Alicization seems to be building on the themes it explored in Mother’s Rosario. Especially in the sense of finding ways to create a virtual reality fantasy that is more than a game. It’s what I want from SAO, but I wonder how other long time fans feel about this narrative focus? That’s become a more interesting question as the direction of this arc becomes clear.

If nothing else I feel good about the storytelling of Alicization. Episode four had a great fight and hit all the right emotional notes. I can’t wait to see where it goes next. I hope other fans are enjoying it as much as I am.

Otakusphere (not) Weekly Episode 30: Join the Club Already

This week, LB, Lifesong and I discuss business dealings between Crunchyroll and Funimation, as well as a whole bunch of currently airing anime. Shows covered include, but are not limited to:

Tsurune

SAO Alicization

Uzamaid!

Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Sempai

Run With The Wind

Ms. Vampire Who Lives in My Neighborhood

Conception (dropped LIKE A TON OF BRICKS.)

So, how are you guys liking these more casual-format podcasts? I liked doing the edited shows, but as time went on, they became increasingly impractical, as our long hiatus in 2017 shows. I like having the opportunity to chat about new, currently airing stuff without having to wait for episodes to go through the editing process, plus all the other complications that went along with that. Still, I’m open to suggestions– unless your suggestion is “Karen, I want you to spend five hours editing each episode of the podcast,” because that’s just silly.

Sword Art Online Alicization, Episode Three

LB:

First off, let’s address the elephant in the room: What is Japan’s obsession with goblins right now? They’ve appeared in at least three series this season alone. Is this Japan’s new shiny toy?

Getting to the actual episode, I have to admit that this season of SAO is moving way too slow. I realize that they have over fifty episodes to fill this time around, but can we please get some action sequences that don’t involve a big tree? The only time Kirito has held a sword this season is to attack wood, and that just doesn’t have the same impact as when he’s in a real fight against another person.

The whole story with Alice and Eugeo is proving to be a slog in the early going. I’d love to say that my endless love for SAO can get me through this early bit of story set-up, but the sheer amount of exposition we have to sit through is proving to be a bit much.

Here’s to hoping that things turn around quickly.

Lifesong:

Good lord, Kirito take down that tree already, I’m sick of looking at it! Better yet, Eugeo should take it down. That’s the better path forward, and the one I hope this arc takes if we have to spend another minute staring at the thing.

Sure, if Kirito goes into OP Jesus Mode and takes down the tree like it never mattered, that’s a lame end for the tree. But who cares about the tree? Okay, so half the anime fandom will work itself into a frenzy if Kirito kills that tree with a single sword skill. My opinion? Worth it.

Even if Kirito does take down the tree in a single hit on his way back to town, you won’t hear me complain. “But Lifesong,” you say, “we don’t want to see Kirito be all OP, OP protagonists are boring!” No, you’re wrong. Not about OP protagonists, but about the way this story is treating Kirito.

Kirito isn’t the hero character right now. He might take over that role at any point…that point might even be episode 3. I hope not, but it could be. If we look at the typical hero’s journey flow chart for a story, then Eugeo is the hero and Kirito is the mentor. However, I’m not sure if I buy that yet myself. I can see it with a heroine, but with a male character?

There is nothing wrong with the wizard working his magic. In this case the wizard is Kirito, Eugeo is the hero and we even have a replacement damsel for Alice; Selka steps up to fill the role for her too-removed-from-current-events-to-act-as-narrative-carrot sister. The comparison to Sugu makes me think about how forgotten Sugu is in the greater narrative. Maybe this is preparation for her return to relevance? Or maybe it’s a repeat storytelling tactic to bridge a boring part of the story to a more interesting one…

I find myself in an annoying spot with this Alicization story line. From a storytelling perspective, it’s doing fine. I like epic fantasy stories that start from humble origins and snowball into something massive. Alicization is hitting all the right notes to do that; It’s just doing it in short bursts over the length of a month. The pacing is an issue, but only because I can’t watch more now.

Imagine waiting three weeks to get through the into segment of The Hobbit. You know, the part where Gandalf convinces Bilbo to go on an adventure with the dwarves. Spending two hours on the lead in to an adventure is okay; in fact, I like stories that start this way. It gives me an easy in to invest in the characters naturally, without forced urgency. But spending three weeks on this is hard to take.

Looking back on this arc once everything has aired, my complaints will likely be gone. Right now? Well, at least we have hints that something might happen next week. Who knew I’d be so happy to see some goblins show up? How will Kirito and Eugeo get out of this predicament? Maybe the goblins just happen to have a magic axe that kills demon trees while they’re at it? I’d accept it.

Karen:

I’m filling in my part of the post last this week, so I can see above that LB and Lifesong are both frustrated with the pacing of this arc. I’m not sure how I feel; I’m not exactly riveted, but I have faith that things are going to pick up soon. Part of that confidence is likely due to the fact that I’ve been hearing good things about this arc in the novels for years, so I’m willing to be patient for a while. If I had no knowledge of the source material, I wonder if I’d be as forgiving?

And yeah, can we just stop with the goblins already? First Goblin Slayer freaked me out with it’s terrifying goblins, then That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime healed my psychic wounds with helpless, adorable goblins. Now SAO is trying to give me PTSD again with cruel, human-trafficking goblins, and I’m just tired of this goblin morality yo-yo. Next thing you know Conception will introduce elegant, angelic healer-goblins or something, but who knows, that might actually make that show watchable? It could happen.

Back to SAO, I’m interested with what’s going on with Eugeo here. Back in the premiere episode, when Eugeo froze trying to save Alice, I thought he was struggling against his programming: he’s been conditioned (for lack of a better word) to follow the Taboo Index, only Kirito was urging him to rebel against the system, and it seemed like it was causing his Fluctlight into a Blue Screen of Death situation. At the end of this episode, Eugeo is freaking out again, but it’s not clear if he’s having programming conflicts, or if he’s just plain terrified of the goblins. Maybe both?

I think ultimately Eugeo and Alice are going to transcend being “artificial” Fluctlights and become real people (possibly other characters too), but there’s potential to do something interesting here. After all, the title “Alicization” makes it appear as though the arc is going to focus on a transition involving Alice, but wouldn’t it be interesting if the more important character was Eugeo, and Alice’s role is something else entirely?

Okay, I’m as bored with the unchoppable Demon Tree as everyone else, but I’m still intrigued with where the show is going overall.

Sword Art Online Alicization, Episode 2

Lifesong:

Kirito in Underworld works a lot better after hearing an explanation of the Fluctlight. I liked the flow of episode two; this place now has enough nuance to create a mysterious atmosphere. Kirito rediscovering it bit by bit was much more interesting than our introduction.

I found it interesting to note that Kirito can’t immediately spot the tell-tale signs of a digital world. You’d think he would know immediately based off the look and feel of it, but It takes seeing a digital menu to convince him that he’s in a virtual world. It isn’t hard to guess why someone might want to make a seemingly perfect virtual utopia like this. It makes the question of why they want to hide it from testers a more compelling mystery.

Connecting directly to the fluctlight in someone’s head gives digital worlds new options. The concept of transporting those light signals into a computer makes for good science fiction. Kirito’s theory that the NPCs in this world are too realistic is the clue. Imagine that as a company, you can offer a sort of digital afterlife. I’m sure that would find a market. The implications are fascinating.

Time passes faster in the virtual world than it does in reality. That means increasing the experiences one person can have during their life. Not only can you experience life longer, but you can potentially live forever inside the machine. That’s speculation to some degree, but it seems to be the general direction this arc of Sword Art Online is taking. If the company that made Underworld can copy a human soul and then host it in a human world without a human body… That’s basically immortality.

One last thing I found worth commenting on is the way Kirito is able to use a sword skill from Aincrad. Perhaps the base for this world is similar, but I suspect it’s more than that. Fluctlight is someone’s soul, right? It contains their memories and personality from real life. Wouldn’t it also contain their memories from time spent in other digital worlds? It may be more than sword skills Kirito that can use in Underworld. How long will it be before Kirito is flying around with magical imp wings, cursing himself for never learning any magic in Alfheim Online? Or you know, never bothering to fire a gun in GGO? I’m sure he’ll figure out a way to cope, but the implications are fascinating to think about.

Karen:

Though this arc is playing around with a lot of really interesting ideas, this episode was rather dull. Since Kirito doesn’t remember his original trip to Underworld, we’re stuck watching Kirito relearn all the things that we already know from Episode 1, which is a little frustrating. Watching Kirito put his deductive reasoning to work to figure out what’s going on keeps things from getting too boring, but I have to wonder if there wasn’t a better way to do this.

Speaking of boring, there’s poor Eugeo’s calling: hacking the same tree with an axe 2,000 times every day. I don’t know the significance of the Demon Tree to Underworld yet, but I took this as a commentary on the mind-numbing repetition of the kind of tasks you tend to take on in virtual worlds; daily quests you can repeat for years, killing the same monster over and over again in the hopes of snaring that .01% drop, and so on and so forth. One of the premises that the isekai genre is based on is “living in a world with video game mechanics would be hella fun”; here, we’re getting the opposite view.

And yet, Underworld isn’t supposed to be a game, as far as I can tell; there are no goals for the player. Yet it’s clearly based on games, and I would bet money it uses some of the same code from SAO, which is why Kirito’s sword skills seems to work in Underworld. It seems like Kayaba Akihito was the only one in the world who could program virtual reality worth a damn, so even years after the SAO incident, people are still ripping off his work. Kind of depressing, but certainly not unrealistic.

The most important thing we learn here is that Underworld is likely populated by Artificial Fluctlights– newborns that had their souls “cloned,” then raised from birth in this virtual environment. Huh. In Ordinal Scale, there’s some talk that the programmers have had enough with the “top-down” approach to AI; raising artificial souls from birth would definitely seem to be more of a bottom-up approach. It is a bit jarring that actual people are involved– I would have assumed that to make an Artificial Fluctlight, they would have just used algorithms or whatever to make a fake personality. Copying existing people’s personalities adds a whole ‘nother layer of ethical wtf-ery on top of everything.

I wonder about the role of the Church in this story. Unless the show does something really unexpected, wouldn’t the Church in Underworld be 100% right about everything? Their world really was created by a superior being (or beings), who watches over everything they do, and so on and so forth. Oddly, Kirito is a non-believer in the sense that he doesn’t have to believe; he knows. I’m kind of hoping that Kirito starts using prayer as a means to communicate with the developers, because I’m always interested when fiction explores inside-out religion; it’s one of my weird hang-ups.

Hopefully we’ve gotten all the (slightly painful) exposition out of the way and can move on to more exciting things now. There’s a lot of potential here, but it’s hard to be properly excited by it when most of the episode is taken up by two dudes talking under a tree.

First Look: Sword Art Online III, Alicization

Lifesong:

Digital spirituality is a theme that’s had hints in past story arcs. This is the first time the show addresses the idea so directly. All the jargon Kirito was throwing around as he explained where soul lives in the human mind was a bit much. The system he’s been helping to test didn’t immediately click into place with the story like I felt it should, and I had a strong urge to pull out a book on neuroscience by the end of it all. I guess that’s that not an awful thing for an anime to accomplish, but it felt a bit weird. I don’t mind some technobabble, but I don’t know enough to appreciate it yet.

Child Kirito in Underworld was an interesting way to start the new season. I felt like it wasn’t a particularly good hook, but the end of the episode made up for that. I have a feeling I’ll be going back through the first 25 minutes of this episode in a few weeks. There were a dozen concepts thrown around. They seemed important, but didn’t connect to anything I’m aware of in the SAO universe. Once the story has started to develop a bit more and I understand what the Taboo Index is, I’ll want to look back. For now, I’ll be happy to know why Alice and Eugeo are important enough to warrant so much early attention.

I was a little put off by the way the show starts without giving context. A few hints at who Alice and Eugeo are or why I should care would have been awesome. Why do I need to care about them? Overall I still liked their story, I just found the introduction odd.

I loved the short GGO sequence that followed immediately after Kirito leaves Underworld and reunites with his friends; Lightsaber Asuna was looking badass in her GGO attire. The vehicular mini-gun seemed like a perfect fit for Silica. It was good fun to see this cast again and begin a new adventure with them, and nearly everyone got a chance to show up and contribute something here.

That ending… Kirito and Asuna are all having a sappy moment, talking about their future and American… Kirito is all excited about leaving Kayaba Akihiko’s influence on behind to focus on the future. BAMN, bad things. You’ll need to watch to know what those are. I guess the story wouldn’t be as interesting if that worked out too easily for them.

It was a bit of a rough start, but not an uninteresting one. I’m super exited to see where this story arc is going.

LB:

Without a single doubt in my mind, SAO III was my ‘go to’ this season. No matter what other dreck the season churned out, this was my golden, shining ray of hope. Something that I could undoubtedly look forward to. Well, the first episode is out. Does it live up to the lofty standards that I’ve come to hold for this series?

Starting things off, it should be noted that SAO III starts with a double-length premiere which begins with Kirito as a child in a strange fantasy village with two other young children. Over the course of the first half, these children face a big event which separates them in a very dramatic fashion. Flash forward to the present and we learn that Kirito is testing a new piece of full-dive equipment which stimulates a person’s soul (which apparently resides in little tubes inside someone’s brain).

This was not an easy episode to get into. I absolutely understand why they went with an hour-long premiere, there was just so much that had to be told right away and there was no way to do it in only 25 minutes. That said though, with absolutely zero context given for why we were seeing the events of the first half until late in the episode, there is going to be a lot of confusion from longtime fans who haven’t yet read the light novels. Then Kirito’s technical monologue about soul technology in the second half made my head hurt even more, which did this episode absolutely zero favors. I get that they were trying their best to cram in a lot of information that the audience needed to know right away but good gods, that speech absolutely killed me.

Additionally, it should be noted that this is not a season for newbies to try and jump into the middle of. All throughout the episode, the series references major events of the past two seasons and does absolutely nothing to remind viewers of what happened during those events, so if you’re not already up to date on SAO history and lore, you’re flying SOL.

That said though, there were still a ton of fantastic things in this episode that fans of the franchise will adore. Besides the story set up, there are a couple of fun action sequences that remind us that Kirito and Asuna are badasses who don’t take any crap from anyone. Specifically, I’m talking about Asuna in her GGO gear kicking ass with a laser sword to take out another group.

Overall, this is the same SAO that we’ve come to know and love. While the first episode gets off to a bit of a rocky start due to the sheer amount of exposition we’re forced to swallow, I have absolutely zero doubts that the next year is going to be completely and totally worth it.

Karen:

For a fan-favorite series, it’s kind of impressive that SAO would do something as potentially alienating to its fanbase as start out with a mysterious, half-hour-long sequence that does nothing but baffle everyone. Of course, this is the show that started out in season one by skipping two years of story continuity in Aincrad, with only the barest acknowledgement, so I really shouldn’t be surprised at this point. SAO takes a lot of risks that I still don’t feel like it gets proper credit for.

I was spoiled for this season, because I knew what was going to happen to Kirito at the beginning of this arc; I don’t know anything that happens afterward, but I knew that going in. So I spent this whole episode waiting for Kirito to get stabbed, and it kind of became this weird horror movie experience. It was actually a relief at the end of the episode when it finally happened, because then I could stop worrying about it.

This arc looks like it’ll be dealing with really huge themes, like the nature of the human soul and how far artificial intelligence can be pushed to resemble human intelligence. This is a good thing, because it’s really interesting territory for just about everyone (who isn’t interested in the future of AI?), but it’s also fraught with peril. I mean, do we really want SAO attempting to explain things like where the human soul exists in the body, and the nature of sentience, etc.? I mean, maybe Kirito is not the person I want exploring the subjects that humanity’s brightest minds have been grappling with for eons, you know? Maybe Kirito is not that guy.

Still, even if this storyline ultimately fails, it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a really ambitious failure, and I can get behind that.

On a more casual note, it was nice to see the whole gang together again. Early on, the strength of SAO was in the setting, and the characters were kind of perfunctory, but I’ve grown fond of them over time. I don’t stay up at night wondering what Klein or Liz do during the day, but I still smile a little bit when both of them show up…not to mention Silica with a Jeep-mounted machine gun; that was inspired.

Asuna I do care about a little more, seeing how she’s grown over time, and seeing her in GGO wielding a sword was gratifying. I wonder: can Asuna perform Mother’s Rosario in GGO? I need to know the answer; SAO, please don’t make me wait on this. Mother’s Rosario can make me cry, and I need to know if I should have tissues handy during any future GGO sequences.

Another interesting note was how Agil was just hanging out unobtrusively in the background while Kirito gave his whole “Let me tell you how human souls work” speech. Bet you $10 that it’s going to end up being significant that Agil heard that conversation, and he’s going to use that info to end up saving everyone’s asses, since that’s what he does. Best coffee shop barista/ bartender ever.

I’m withholding judgement on the whole Alice-in-Wonderland theme until I have a better idea what they’re doing with it, but on the whole, I’m excited to see if this series can really do something with these high concept, unapologetically intellectual themes while doing them real justice. Oh, and I hope that Kirito gets better and stuff, if he dies that really messes up my headcanon for everything that’s supposed to happen later on in Accel World.

Otakusphere (not) Weekly Episode 29

Look, it’s another new episode of the podcast just a week after the last one! If we can keep this up, the name of the podcast is going to become “Otakusphere (kinda?) Weekly.”

This week, we were really busy discussing the first episodes of the Fall 2018 shows. Key questions that occupied us: Should Sword Art Online really be talking about the nature of the human soul? What did English-speaking peoples do to A Certain Magical Index III to piss it off? Should Crunchyroll have some kind of a content warning for Goblin Slayer? (Spoiler: YES). And does Studio Trigger forever deserve it’s reputation for jerky animation after Kill La Kill, even something like 5 years later? All this, and more, on this episode of Otakusphere (Occasionally) Weekly!

Note: The director of Uzamaid! is Masahiko Oota, director of Himouto! Umaru-chan and like half of all comedy anime.

Otakusphere (not) Weekly: Episode 28

After a slew of technical difficulties, thanks to Youtube Livestreaming, the podcast is back! LB was busy having a life this week (don’t know what’s up with that), but that leaves Karen, Sal and Lifesong to go through the Fall 2018 Anichart and pick out what we’re watching. Topics covered include Space Fishing vs. Soul Fishing, feline urban planning, and how we’ve become absolute anime studio partisans after swearing we would never, ever do that.

This is a different format for us, but one that’s probably going to be more workable long-term than posting the edited shows we were doing before. If you absolutely loved the edited shows, where I made an effort to remove some of the dumb nonsense that comes out of my mouth and most gratuitous “UM” sounds, speak now or forever hold your peace.