Tag Archives: light novel

Getting Acquainted With Light Novels

I’ve been aware of Light Novels for a long time, but somehow avoided reading them. I knew that a lot of my favorite anime were based on LNs, and the the subject matter of many of them was likely to appeal to me, but I always had other things to read that seemed more important. Plus, for a long time, it was hard to even get LNs through legal channels.

With the addition of services like J-Novel Club and Yen On to the marketplace, however, that last part has changed tremendously. Now, instead of occasionally seeing an LN release from a hugely popular series like The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, which was the case for many years, we’ve got more legally translated light novels available than anyone could possibly read. Well, it may be possible to read them all; my husband is certainly trying. His commute to work, once a time for games, has become Official Light Novel Book Club. In fact, due to his LN obsession, I think he’s clocked more books read this year than I have; this is not okay. Clearly, I needed to start reading LNs and catch up!

So for the past week or two, I’ve been dipping into my husband’s impressive collection of LNs on Kindle. I’ve read I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years and Maxed Out My Level, Volumes 1 &2, and Lazy Dungeon Master Volume 1. Obviously, I’ve just started getting acquainted with this genre, but I’ve noticed some things about it so far that I find really interesting.

What’s “Light” About Light Novels?

To get a good idea of where my tastes tend to lie as a reader, it might be useful to know that the last book I read before Killing Slimes was War and Peace…yes, that War and Peace. I like 19th and early 20th-century novels and I try to read a few every year; if I don’t, I’m afraid I’ll lose the ability to appreciate them, because it does require a certain kind of attention span. So I generally like my books long, detailed, and filled with atmosphere– even if said atmosphere adds about 500 pages of length to an otherwise simple story.

To someone with my reading habits, LNs are kind of a shock to the system. As a longtime gamer (and an anime fan for nearly as long), the subject matter of many LNs is right up my alley; I dig isekai, things involving dungeons, etc. However, the style of LNs is so different from the likes of Tolstoy and D.H. Lawrence, these books may as well come from another dimension. Gone are the paragraphs and paragraphs of description; gone is the deep characterization, the finely-rendered locations that have such a strong sense of place, you almost feel like you could live there yourself. All that breadth, all that depth, poof, gone.

A description of a forest in an old-fashioned novel could take several pages, delving into the flora and fauna, and the psychological impact of the forest on several different characters, and how their different responses to the forest reveal deeply embedded idiosyncrasies, how said characters view the world in general. A description of a forest in an LN tends to be like this: “There was a forest outside the house. It was a pretty big forest, and some mushrooms grew there. I saw rabbits there sometimes.”

It would be easy to jump to conclusions about what I’m saying here; that Heavy Novels=good!, Light Novels=Bad! But that hasn’t been my experience. What I find genuinely surprising is that, even in the absence of description, my brain fills in the gaps. The forest in Killing Slimes may be very simply drawn on paper, yet I find the image of the forest in my mind is still vivid. Similarly, while the characters often seem quite stock (typically they have one or two character traits and that’s about it), occasionally they’ll do something unexpected that hints at hidden depths. Basically what seems like it should be a shallow experience on paper, becomes a well-rounded experience in my mind.

I wonder why that is? Is that the secret of LNs– that we don’t actually need all these details to become fully immersed in an imaginary world, and sometimes the bare-bones approach is more than enough in practice? Or am I just filling in gaps in my mind because, as a more old-school reader, I expect breadth and depth and if it’s not there, I’m more than happy to make it up myself? I mean, maybe other readers aren’t getting a very vivid picture of a forest when they read I’ve Been Killing Slimes for 300 Years and Maxed Out My Level; maybe they’re just seeing some trees? I have no idea.

I’m looking forward to reading more LNs, especially Reborn as a Vending Machine, I Now Wander the Dungeon, and The Hero and His Elf Bride Open a Pizza Parlor in Another World. I’m also looking forward to reading more stuff by Edith Wharton, Thomas Hardy, and  Fyodor Dostoevsky; I don’t expect LNs to replace old-fashioned novels for me. But I’m discovering there might be a weird kind of interplay between the two for me, and that’s really intriguing.

 

That Time I Got Reincarnated As a Slime, Episode 2

We return to the adventures of the world’s most stupidly overpowered slime. Last time, our slime buddy met Veldora, a trapped dragon, and a beautiful, cross-species friendship blossomed. Now, Rimuru is trying to get Veldora out of his magical prison, but it seems like there may be limits to even the godlike powers of the slime…OR ARE THERE?

Ok, I admit, I’m confused here. First Rimiru tries to eat the barrier around Veldora, only to fail. Then, not ten minutes later, he eats all of Veldora, INCLUDING the barrier, and that goes fine? Let’s not even touch on the intriguing fact that Rimiru’s stomach is apparently some kind of portal to another dimension containing infinite space, why did that work the second time? Maybe his mistake the first time was trying to eat the barrier as a separate entity? Or did he succeed in analyzing the barrier with Great Sage in between his two attempts?

I don’t get it, so I’m just going to move on. Should I use this picture from now on whenever I’m confused by anything in an anime, by the way? That seems economical.

His best dragon buddy tucked away somewhere in the Infinite Digestion Dimension, Rimiru continues to make his way out of the cave, eating more giant monsters as he goes and gaining their abilities. By about the halfway mark of this episode, Rimiru has become so stupidly overpowered that I can’t see how anything short of an extinction-level event could possibly threaten him, but that’s not necessarily a problem. Sometimes a story requires a character to be super-powerful from the beginning, even though it defies narrative convention, and that definitely seems to be where this show is going. It’s interesting to me though that the main criticism of this show (that I’ve seen) is that it’s “too gamey,” meanwhile no JRPG actually works like this.

Or to put it in JRPG terms, in the space of this one episode, Rimiru went from using a basic Bolt spell to W-Summoning Knights of the Round, backed up with a mastered Final Attack-Phoenix. You are now geekier just for having read this sentence, and have a sudden urge to go breed pastel ostriches.

Interestingly, Veldora’s disappearance into the Digestive Dimension appears to have created a power vacuum, even though Veldora was incapable of doing much for hundreds of years. I like the fact that in this world, strong monsters have political significance in the same way that natural barriers do in our world. Basically, Veldora was the mountains around Switzerland, and now everyone is coming for your sweet hot cocoa.

Serious Politics be happening here. I like the dragon-eating parts of the episode better.

Sadly, during all this political talk, no one says “We have all the best dragons, just the very best wyrms and firedrakes; I like dragons who DON’T get imprisoned in a magical barrier for 300 years,” so there went the show’s one chance at doing salient political comedy.

On the way out of the cave, Rimiru runs into a party of human adventurers, and my PTSD from Goblin Slayer kicks in. I was afraid that the humans were going to be brutally raped and murdered the instant they stepped foot inside the cave, but fortunately– since this show is pretty much the anti-Goblin Slayer— nothing like that happens. Even if some mean monsters tried to harass the humans, I guess Rimiru would just eat them and get new skills, so that’s comforting.

Nooo, go away innocent little blond mage girl! This cave is full of evil monsters, and only death and dismemberment lie before you! Oh wait, a reincarnated virgin salary man killed and ate all of the monsters already, looks like you’re fine? Err, don’t get cocky though.

So Rimiru finally gets outside, and then confuses me again by musing about his good friend Veldora Tempest, and how they haven’t seen each other lately. Maybe it’s a translation thing, but Rimiru’s lines here make it sound like he honestly doesn’t know where Veldora is and is hoping to run into him again soon. Dude, Veldora is in your belly, I’m pretty sure you were there for that.

Then my PTSD triggers again, because Rimiru is attacked by goblins! Except instead of being cruel, bestial, predatory goblins, these goblins are adorable little munchkins who look like they couldn’t hurt anyone. Like, if one of these goblins tried to assault someone, they would probably trip on the way there, get a nosebleed, then cry and need to go get a hug and a kiss from Mommy Goblin. This show has now healed my PTSD from Goblin Slayer, and I am very grateful.

This is how I like my goblins, Level 1 mobs wielding useless weapons and cowering like terrified third-graders. That grimdark show can go fuck itself.

I know it sounds like I’m making a joke here, but seriously? I’m actually very happy to have images of these super-nice goblins override the other ones in my mind. Very happy indeed. Sometimes the only cure for anime is indeed, more anime.

Oh my God it’s cute little gob kids, I want to hug all of them! Praise the cute goblins! Love the cute goblins! Forget all the more mythologically accurate goblins!

The goblins worship Veldora like a God, and the disappearance of their God is causing major problems. Rimiru never lets it slide that he ate their God, which is probably wise; no adherents of any faith have ever taken that news well. However, with the Direwolves now attacking Goblin Village, the gobs need a powerful monster on their side if they have any hopes of surviving. Fortunately for them, Rimuru Tempest, First of His Name, Eater of Dragons, Keeper of the Mysterious Hard Drive, Holy Virgin SalaryMan, and One True Scion of Pokemon Mystery Dungeon, is on the case!

The episode ends before the Direwolf attack commences; I think we’re supposed to be wondering what Rimiru’s strategy is here, but honestly, does it matter? Based on past experience, Rimiru can just eat all the Direwolves for dinner while the rest of the goblins sit around painting their toenails– but that would make for a pretty boring episode 3, so that’s probably not going to happen. Maybe Rimiru will just eat all the Goblins, they can go to the Infinite Digestion Dimension, and become one with their God? I’m not really looking for spiritual enlightenment from this anime, but hey, if it happens, I wouldn’t be opposed to it.

So that was episode 2 of That Time I got Reincarnated as A Slime. I’m pretty sure that one day, I will regret blogging about this show, but that day is not today.

 

First Look: That Time I Got Reincarnated As a Slime

Lifesong:

Why is some robot voice granting special powers to a dying salary man? What kind of nasty stuff does he have on his PC? What exactly does it mean to be reborn in a fantasy world as a slime? That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime doesn’t attempt to answer the first two questions it throws at us; I fear it might cop out on the third.

Our protagonist isn’t an ordinary slime. If that’s what you wanted out of this anime, you had best give up now. Given the speed he is powering up I suspect he won’t be spending too much time as a blob- like object. Promo art and then the ED animation all but confirm a more humanoid form.

The pacing takes a slow approach to introducing us to our slime’s new home. The unique aspect of being reborn as a slime carries the episode and makes it into something funny. I’m glad the episode decided to focus in on the little details of what it means to be a slime. We don’t know why he is special exception to the general “slimes are mindless” rule, but the comedy makes it work. The implications of being a super powered slime are amusing to think about if nothing else.

How long it will be before Satoru has a reason to ingest a human and take on their form? Will he even keep the same name? Is he even still a he? I bet slimes are gender neutral and… Oh god, what is the appropriate gender pronoun for a slime?

To its credit and my surprise, none of the heroines show up in episode one. Instead, the first companion for our slime protagonist is Storm Dragon Veludora. I had a good laugh at his tsundere act. I’m not entirely convinced he won’t turn out to be a she and transform into a humanoid loli dragon form, but so far so good.

I expect this anime to have harem elements so it’s interesting the first episode didn’t feel a need to show any of it. We got a quick mention of wanting to “screw every girl I see” as he is dying, but that was it. It’s a safe enough bet the “predator” skill our slimy protagonist gets out of the whole dying deal will be the cause of harem antics. I liked the way episode one dodged around that for an episode and introduced us to dragon bro instead.

I’m not sure what I expect out of That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime, but episode one sold me on watching more. I felt like the storytelling both knows what it’s doing and feels confident about it. Those are good signs. I can’t wait to see how it all plays out as the implications of becoming a slime god in another world unfold.

Karen:

Funny, I had just been reading complaints about how the isekai genre was played out and creatively bankrupt, and then I saw this show. I don’t know if it’s going to prove to be all that innovative (time will tell), but it did an excellent job of reminding me why isekai stories are fun in the first place. It’s light and playful, but also goes into considerable detail about the kind of issues you might face if you suddenly found yourself reincarnated in another world. Questions like, can a slime see without eyes? And if you were reincarnated as a monster, how would you know what you were?

Probably the most interesting idea here is the notion that your “powers” in the other world are determined by your last words/thoughts in the human world. Granted, it seems like a lot of people would say some variation of “ow,” so pain nullification should be a common skill. Still, it’s intriguing to wonder where this system comes from. Is some benevolent, God-like creature trying to correct the injustices of life by giving good people another shot at existence, but kind of screwing up the finer details? Considering the way all-powerful dragon Verudora acts, I think powerful characters on this show may all be slightly confused and incompetent, which I dig personally.

I’m also really curious to find out what the deal is with the girl who apparently died during WWII. Maybe her last words were “Damn, I really hate fascism,” and her powerset involves being super-libertarian? Does that count as political humor, and if so, should I flog myself?

Just about the only thing I didn’t like about this show was the fact that the OP gives away the fact that Satoru, our slime-protagonist, eventually gets some sort of human form. You would think that would be a secret to keep under wraps for at least an episode or two, right? Of course, this may only bother me because I’m intrigued by the idea of the main character being stuck as a bouncing slime for 24 episodes, because it seems like it would be a nightmare for the writers. So basically, I’m a sadist who wants to see the staff of this show suffer, but you should probably ignore that and just focus on the fact that this show looks like it’s going to be some good, clean, JRPG-inspired fun.

Well, relatively clean; I don’t think we really want to know what was on Satoru’s hard drive.

LB:

I’m going to sum up why you need to watch this series in two words: tsundere dragon.

What? You need more? Alright, here goes… while I’ve said out loud in public that I am feeling “over” the isekai genre, this one caught me off guard with how downright cute it is. While the initial set up of Satoru getting stabbed out on the street and being worried about people finding out what porn he has on his computer during his dying moments is a little bizarre, the subsequent time that we spend with him in his slime form was absolutely charming.

While I didn’t like the change from his original gruff male voice to something much more high pitched and perky, that’s a minor complaint, since it ended up growing on me within a matter of minutes.

The only really frustrating thing about this episode is that most of it is spent explaining Satoru’s new basic slime skills rather than setting up the story and world that we’ll be spending the next 24 episodes in. With that much time to kill though, there is no real rush and while some people might find the pace to be a bit too relaxed, I have full confidence in what I’m now certain will be an enjoyable ride. Pick this one up early and get ready for two cours of fun.