Tag Archives: Final Fantasy

Long Island Retro Gaming Expo 2018: Picks From the Dealers’ Room

This may shock you, but I spent too much money in the Dealers’ Room once again. I joked after Cradle Con that I wasn’t going to spend any more money on games or anime for the rest of the year and uh…yeah, I lied. I am a liar. I am setting a bad example for my family.

Nevertheless, I cannot go back in time and unspend all this money (not that I would), so I may as well take advantage of my fevered shopping spree by getting a blog post out of it. Seriously, if I go to Anime NYC (or any other con) anytime soon, I’m probably going to have to make a point of avoiding the dealers room, since I really can’t afford to do this. But enough realistic negativity, I have swag to show off!

I filled out my PS1 RPG collection with these two gems, which I’ve wanted for a long time. I’ve always been intrigued by the dating/weapon forging mechanics in Thousand Arms, and the job system in Star Ocean: The Second Story always sounded exactly like my cup of tea. There are PSP remakes of the early Star Ocean games, but from what I’ve read, I’m better off with the original here anyway. I wish I’d bought more of these games back when they came out, but back then, I only had so much babysitting money….

Speaking of RPGs, I needed this to fill out my FF collection so I can make good on my ongoing threat of Let’s Playing them all some day. Technically I do own these games already (Final Fantasy: Dawn of Souls for the GBA), but I’ve decided recently that I’d rather have everything in Playstation format when possible. PSX discs are readily available, usually inexpensive, and easy to (legally) play on the computer with an emulator.

For the record, I’ve never actually finished FF1; I’ve played about 75% of the way through it several different times, but just never completed it for some reason. I need to fix that sometime soon. FF2 I have yet to even attempt.

Not JRPGs? There must be some mistake!

I wasn’t planning on buying these, but I’ve been hearing since the ’90s that the Legacy of Kain series is high-quality, and these were really inexpensive. As an Eidos series, Kain is kind of like Lara Croft’s brother anyway, right? It made sense in my head.

After attending Leonard Herman’s panel on video game history, I was really curious to read his book. Phoenix has been around since 1994, but the fourth edition covers games history through 2015, so there’s a lot to go through here. I’ve started reading it and find it quite addictive, even if a lot of it is dedicated to covering dodgy peripherals for obscure systems I never knew existed.

Mr. Herman was really nice and even offered to help me raid the Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester to get at their JRPG collection, although I was kidding about that. Or…maybe he was kidding. Let’s assume someone was kidding.

Most of you probably need some background in order to understand why I absolutely lost my shit when fell over this. Versus Books was a company that put out unauthorized game guides back in the ’90s, and they’ve been all but forgotten today. What a lot of people don’t know is that in addition to being very thorough, the Versus guides were also hilarious; reading the Metal Gear Solid book is almost as fun as playing the game itself. Years ago, my brother wrote to the company to try to get a copy of this guide, but they were out of business at that point and it seemed like there was no way to get it.

I don’t know if they used this book to take the piss out of FF7 the way they did for MGS and Resident Evil 2, but if there’s even a chance, I have to find out. Plus, maybe I’ll finally learn how to master all those stupid Gold Saucer minigames that I suck at.

One of the only early Tomb Raider guides that I didn’t already have. I like to collect the TR strategy guides because I need them to complete the damned things I like the extra stuff that’s often included in these books. Chronicles was the installment of TR that came with the infamously robust Tomb Raider Level Editor (TRLE), so I’m curious to see what the book has to say about that.

Apparently magazine ads for games have become collectibles, which makes sense; they often make nice mini-posters. I didn’t think this was something I was that interested in until I saw that they had an add for Ehrgeiz, then I just had to get it. I got a few more of these while I was there (see header). Sadly, they did not have any ads for Parasite Eve. I also picked up one for the original Advance Wars for my brother, since that’s one of his all-time favorites.

These were free, yaaay! Old School Gamer Magazine was kind enough to give away sample issues to anyone who signed up for their email list. I’m glad to discover another print game magazine, since all my favorite ones ceased publication long ago. This mag just started last year, but it has a very experienced team of writers. I’m definitely going to keep up with it and hope they keep publishing it for a long time.


This concludes my posts on LIRGE for 2018. I hope you all enjoyed getting a peek at this fun convention, and consider coming down in 2019 if you’re anywhere near the NY area. LIRGE also includes Tabletop Expo, which I did not cover because I had my hands full with the video game component, but I hope to spend more time there next year. Tabletop Expo might be spun off into it’s own convention next year, so definitely keep tabs on the LIRGE website if you’re interested in attending either or both.

Cradle Con 2018

I hadn’t been to a con in years and felt like it was time to get back in the swing of things. Still, I didn’t want to deal with the crowds and hassle associated with a major convention. Cradle Con, a brand-new comic convention, held at The Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City, New York, fit the bill very nicely. I ended up deciding to go pretty much at the last minute, so I wasn’t really prepared to cover it anime-blog-style; plus, for some of the time I had a two-year-old in tow, and she was low on patience. Nevertheless, there were some aspects of the con that I wanted to mention here.

The first is the venue. The Cradle has been host to a bunch of cons (including the Long Island Retro Gaming Expo, which is coming up again in August), but this is the first time I’ve actually been there for an event. I’m pretty sure I’ve been to the museum in the past for normal museum-going purposes, but being there while an event is going on is a unique experience. You’ll be cruising through the dealers’ room, looking for good deals on comic books and video games, and next thing you know, you’re navigating around a fully restored WWII-era bomber. They didn’t really separate the museum exhibits from the convention activities, so it was an interesting mixing of worlds. Most of the conventions I’ve attended have been in boring hotels, or the hellmouth that is the Jacob Javits Center in Manhattan (don’t get me started on that place), so this sort of eclectic atmosphere was inviting.

The first event I went to was a Jpop concert with Nicole Oliva. I hadn’t heard of Oliva before, but she’s an operatically trained singer, and takes her anisongs quite seriously. She’s got a powerful set of pipes and a really laid-back stage presence that makes you feel at ease, and her concert easily surpassed my expectations. I mean, of course she sang Moonlight Densetsu, which I expected, but then she also sang the Sailor Stars! theme from the fifth season, and the newer theme to Sailor Moon Crystal. Her version of 1000 Words from Final Fantasy X-2 gave me chills, and I don’t even like Final Fantasy X-2.

The A10 Thunderbolt II behind Ms. Oliva made a better backdrop for an anime concert than you might think.

Sometimes while in the shower, I imagine getting up on stage at a con and singing my version of Suteki da ne from Final Fantasy X, or Hacking to the Gate from Steins; Gate. The only problem with this plan is that I’m a tremendous coward and will probably never do this. In the meantime, while I try to grow a spine, we can all appreciate Oliva’s performance, since she actually knows what she’s doing.

Next I attended a panel on self-publishing by comic artist Jay Stuart of Poppycock Productions. Most of his work is horror, which isn’t my cup of tea, but he had a lot of good tips on self-publishing…the kind of nuts-and-bolts stuff they don’t tell you until you’re halfway through formatting your comic for print, and then you realize you have a major problem. His advice will likely prove very useful in the event that I ever get back into making comics, which will totally happen as soon as I catch up on my novels and all of my other projects for this blog. Totally.

I also attended the costume contest, which was a lot of fun. Technically Cradle Con has three costume contests: one for kids, one for teens, one for adults. I’m surprised a new con can get enough cosplayers to hold three separate cosplay contests, but I guess that’s the advantage of Long Island; we are stupid overpopulated. We can always find enough kids who want to dress like Pokemon and women who want to dress like Spider-Woman. Anyway, I only attended Saturday, so I only got to see the Adult cosplay contest. Some of the franchises that were represented on stage included Sword Art Online, Sailor Moon, and Final Fantasy XV. There were also quite a few excellent Star Wars costumes; I may not be a Star Wars fan myself, but man, are those people dedicated.

A  note on cosplay photos: I did actually take photos during the con, but I wasn’t sure whether or not I should post them. People who go to Otakon and AX in cosplay know that they’re going to end up included in photo galleries on numerous websites, but that’s not necessarily true of a local con like this. I also didn’t have a press pass, and there was no indication when I was taking photos that I was taking them for any larger purpose, so it just felt kind of morally questionable posting these pictures to Otakusphere. If I go to Cradle Con again next year, which I hope to do, I’d like to go officially as press and then take photos of EVERYTHING.

Lastly, it wouldn’t be a con without my husband and I spending way too much money in the dealer’s room and Artist’s Alley; here’s our haul:

If you’re wondering “How can you afford all that stuff?” the answer is hahaha, WE CAN’T. We kind of blew all of our fun money on this one event and can’t buy anything else for a while. If I go to Anime NYC in the fall, I’m not going to be able to buy anything there except a keychain and a can of soda.

Our loot included three My Little Pony Classic Blind Boxes (which caused me a lot of pain, since I got TWO freakin’ Princess Sparkles and not one Glory), a bunch of Frozen toys to keep the little one happy, a collection of Suburban Fairy Tales by Francis Bonnet, (which came with a neat-o Rapunzel sketch), Suikoden II for PS2 with the strategy guide, a set of Magic cards that my husband just had to buy because he is a slave of WoTC, some X-Men issues from the early ’90s to fill out my collection, an X-Factor trade paperback, a really cool figure of Saber from Fate/Stay Night riding a motorcycle, and a helpful pocket-sized container of hand sanitizer.

All in all, good clean fun. It seemed like everyone around me was really happy to be there, and I think there’s an excellent chance I’ll be heading back to my favorite aviation museum in 2019 for Cradle Con 2.

Final Fantasy VIII and Literary Criticism

RINOA

Note: All quotes from the game taken from Shotgunnova’s Script FAQ.

Warning: This post is going to devote a lot of time to analyzing a theory about Final Fantasy VIII, a game that is now 17 years old, in incredible detail. This is probably going to seem pointless and obsessive, because it is pointless and obsessive, but I’m going ahead with it anyway for two reasons:

  1. I love Final Fantasy VIII. Always have, always will.
  2. The way said theory is typically discussed in FF fandom is to me indicative of a larger issue within the gaming community, which is that– despite the leaps and bounds the medium has made in garnering critical attention– most gamers still have no use for anything that resembles literary criticism. I think that’s a bit of a shame.

Continue reading Final Fantasy VIII and Literary Criticism

On Sailor Moon Crystal

SMCrystalsketchWatching the first episode of the new Sailor Moon, I wonder if it’s possible to have too much reverence for the source material. As promised, Crystal is sticking much closer to Naoko Takeuchi’s manga than the original anime, but as I watched this episode, I found myself wondering if that’s really a good thing. Continue reading On Sailor Moon Crystal

Final Fantasy, Part 1

FinalFantasy

I figured that it was time to make good on my ongoing threat to start blogging the Final Fantasy series from the beginning. I’ve played many of the games, some of them multiple times, but there are several entries I’ve either left unfinished or never even tried. This seems like a good opportunity to raise my FF fandom level from “considerable” to “nuclear,” and that kind of upgrade is always appealing.

However, trying to think of any kind of structure for this beyond “I am playing the games and writing stuff down,” felt pretentious, so I’m just going to do this in the form of sharing my notes as I play. This may change as I get to later FFs that I could probably write entire books about; I will try to restrain myself (but not very hard.)

Continue reading Final Fantasy, Part 1

FFIV: The Uncomfortable Truth

I did this little FFIV strip because I was experimenting with something, which is why it looks a little rough around the edges. Kind of a neat idea though, just taking ideas from random FFs and turning them into one-page strips….next time though, COLOR.

Loved the designs in FFVI DS, by the way- well, except for Rosa; I have no clue what happened there.