Otakusphere Weekly Episode #32: Vampire Investment Tips

This time around, Sword Art Online gets us talking about the future of warfare, we investigate the possible deeper meaning of Mai’s bunny suit in Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai, and I’m getting surprisingly invested in Between Sea and Sky, considering the fact that I still think it’s dumb and it will never stop being dumb in general. In addition, we childishly yell at Kyoto Animation for having the audacity to make a silly archery show instead of Miss Kobayashi’s Dragon Maid Season 2/ Sound Euphonium Season 3/literally anything else, and speculate about Sophie Twilight’s financial situation.

We didn’t end up doing Listener Questions this week, because uh…I forgot. We’ll do it next time, for sure, so if you have any more questions, let us know in the comments.

Also, Paw Patrol is best show and Skye is absolutely BEST GIRL:

Yes mai waifu is a Cocker Spaniel/Poodle mix who flies helicopters, get your own.

That Time I Got Reincarnated As a Slime, Episode 6

This episode really surprised me. When last episode introduced the idea of Shizu as Rimuru’s “destined” person, I thought the show was probably going to take a roundabout route to get to her. Maybe Rimuru and Shizu would meet on different sides of a big conflict, multiple comical misunderstandings would ensue, and it would take about ten episode to clear everything up so they could have a proper heart to heart. Instead, the show skipped all of that tomfoolery and the two of them got to connect almost immediately, with no complications.

You would think that would be an example of boring writing, but in this case, I think they made it work. Especially since the show has already shown that Shizu is part of Rimuru’s destiny, why stall on what’s clearly already a foregone conclusion? If anything, I found it refreshing that the two characters were able to find each other and communicate so clearly without having to deal with arbitrary obstacles placed in their path.

“What fresh hell is this?” wonder the tired adventurers. Plot hell, my friends. You are joining the main plot.

But more on that later. First, the adventurers we met in episode 2 have apparently been having a rough time of it. Their job was to confirm the absence of Veldora, which means their showing up right when Rimuru was leaving the cave wasn’t a coincidence, which it seemed like at the time. Now they’d like to take a little rest from adventuring, but apparently the Adventurer’s Guild owns their asses for life, because they’ve been commanded to go back into the wild and…do what, exactly? It seems like they’re supposed to monitor the monster activity has changed in the post-Veldora landscape.

So they’re assignment is basically “Keep track of how many monsters try to eat you, then report back.” I would not want to be a member of this particular guild; something tells me the benefits are not that great.

Shizu, who we first met waaaaaaay back in the opening scene during the WWII flashback, finally shows up. It’s about time! We still don’t really know what she’s after, but she’s willing to team up with the info-gathering party temporarily, so at least she’s more than just a face in the shadows now.

Total Badass has joined your party.

Meanwhile, Rimuru is testing out his new powers. He uses his imitation skill to turn into a giant Tempest Wolf, then uses his Black Lightning skill. Apparently, when he’s in Tempest Wolf form, the effect of the lightning is amplified, thus it’s super-powerful. Do all of Rimuru’s skills become several times more powerful when he’s in Tempest Wolf form? Because if so, that seems a little broken, even for him. At this rate, a Water Blade from Giant Wolf Rimuru will be able to decapitate entire enemy armies.

Some time has passed in Goblin village, and I’m so glad the show decided to gloss over it to keep things moving. The dwarves are doing their thing, and the village is expanding, and that’s all good but I really don’t need any more details. More interesting is the arrival of 500 Goblins from surrounding villages, who heard about the Goblin Naming ritual and are hoping for their own power-up. I like the common sense characters display in this world. “Wait, you mean the guys in the next village over got to become super hot just by pledging allegiance to some slime? How do we get in on that action?”

Yaaay, more cute Goblin kiddies!…oh, wait. Fuck.

Unfortunately Rimuru grants their request and goes on another Naming spree (wisely not shown), which kind of sucks for me; I was hoping we’d have more cute little-kid type Goblins running around. Now they’re all adults with killer bods and my maternal instinct is left with nothing to hang onto! Well, except for Rimuru himself, I guess; that little motion he does before he transforms is adorable.

Back to our human friends, they’re running for their lives from giant insects because…reasons? Well they give a stupid reason, but the real reason is that the show needs to give Shizu some monsters to beat up so we can all see what a total badass she is. A pretty cool fight scene follows– not quite up to the level of Kirito vs. Head Goblin Dude in Sword Art Online Alicization 4, but still, pretty well-animated. Shizu both viciously stabs things and lights them on fire, which shows a kind of thoroughness that I appreciate. Upon seeing Shizu’s face, Rimiru recognizes her as the girl from the crystal ball and muses that he wasn’t expecting to meet her this soon; you and me both, pal.

Shizu in Action: A Story in Two Parts. Part One.

~fin~

Back in Goblin Town, Rimuru makes a Dragon Quest reference that Shizu laughs at, confirming his suspicions that she’s from his world. At first I thought that was illogical, since Shizu is supposed to come from a time decades before Dragon Quest existed, but they clear up later that she heard about it from another Japanese person, so that’s okay. I can buy that Shizu would have glommed on to any other Japanese immigrants to SlimeWorld that she found and got as much info out of them about her home country as possible.

Then there’s a truly magical scene, where Rimuru shows Shizu how Japan recovered after World War II after she was summoned out of the world in the midst of the Tokyo firebombing. When people talk about “wish fulfillment” in anime, it’s always said in a very dismissive way, like it’s immature and shameful to use media to fulfill wishes. This scene features a very mature kind of wish fulfillment: the desire to somehow connect with people who suffered the worst of the brutalities of history, and show them that the world really did get better after they died. To show them that even if they weren’t lucky enough to experience it, their friends, relatives, and countrymen got to see a much better tomorrow. That the world didn’t end in fire and pain and darkness, because that’s not all there is to life.

I really didn’t expect something this beautiful from this show, and I’m still processing it. I think there’s maybe a broader point here about the isekai genre not necessarily being as escapist as a lot of people think it is, but I have to ruminate on that.

Anyway, just when we thought we had gotten all the info on Shizu we were going to get for one episode, the show gives us her “origin” so to speak. There’s several interesting things going on here: for one, Veldora told us that summons take groups of mages, yet as far as we can see, Shizu was summoned by one guy. Were the other 30 mages just hiding in the shadows, or is this one guy simply that powerful?

Secondly, Powerful Mage Guy gives Shizu to an Ifrit, saying she might “have an affinity to fire.” At first I thought the dude had a screw loose, because look, the poor girl has had part of her skin burned off from the summoning.┬áIf she’s flame-resistant, she’s sure chose an odd way of showing it. I thought about it later though and came up with this: Mage Guy was trying to summon a host for a fire being, and Shizu just happened to be completely surrounded by flames. Considering there seems to be a computer-like intelligence running this world (see: Great Sage), maybe the Computer thought. “Human +fire= host with fire affinity,” when in reality, Shizu just had the bad luck to be in the middle of a burning city when the summoning was going down. It makes sense if the intelligence behind the summoning was ticking boxes and didn’t understand the broader context.

This was…surprisingly terrifying. I think the Final Fantasy games have given me warm and fuzzy feelings toward Ifrits that are quite frankly dangerous. Ifrits are NOT your friend.

If assigning Ifrit to her was basically a mistake, that would explain the health problems she seems to have in this episode; maybe she isn’t better suited to being a host for Ifrit than anyone else, and it’s taking a toll on her body. Or maybe hosting Ifrit is just that arduous, I don’t know. In any case, I’m interested in finding out if my guess about the mechanics of Shizu’s summoning is correct.

So, wow, that was some episode. This show would have to jump the shark pretty darn hard to lose my allegiance after that Rebuilding After The War scene, but I once said that kind of thing about another show, which then proceeded to jump the shark exactly that hard. (It was Amanchu, by the way.) So there are no guarantees, but for now at least, I’m impressed.

Sword Art Online Alicization: Episode 5

Karen:

Since this episode focuses on Asuna, this seems like a good time to take a step back and look at what a cool character she’s become. During the Aincrad arc, she was an immature kid– which was totally understandable, since she was a sheltered teenager drawn into something huge that she couldn’t have anticipated. Nevertheless, she did seem a little whiny and self-centered to begin with. But she’s grown to the point where, by the time of Mother’s Rosario, she not only felt like an adult, but she essentially became co-protagonists with Kirito. That set-up pays dividends here, where the whole episode can be Kirito-free and it never really feels like we’re missing out on the “main” character.

She also functions similar to Kirito now, using the same kind of hands-on approach to problem solving. Part of that is because she hasn’t been his girlfriend for years without learning anything, and part of that just goes to show why they work so well as a couple to begin with. They aren’t together for only superficial reasons; they both have an almost pathological need to right injustices. On a more basic note, we now get Hero! Asuna rescuing Damsel! Kirito, and that’s a nice change of pace.

In terms of the larger story with Rath, I’m wondering about Kirito’s overall significance to the Underworld project. Obviously Rath wants Kirito’s consciousness in there because they expect his presence will cause the AI to grow in a certain way, but does it necessarily have to be Kirito in that role? I think it’s less that Kirito has super-special soul juice or whatever, and more that he just happens to be the person who was integrated into the system first, so Eugeo and Alice have memories of him. If it turns out they need Kirito because he is just that special of a snowflake, I’m going to be a little disappointed.

It was nice to see everyone working together as a team; even something as simple as Klein driving Asuna around in his car shows that in the real world, they all have different roles and can contribute in different ways. Considering one of their team members is a nigh-omnipotent AI, things feel a little bit stacked in their favor, but I guess it’s a little bit late to be complaining about that? It just goes to show, if you ever find a down-on-her-luck orphan, be nice to her: she may turn out to be a Goddess AI who can hack government databases for you! Always a useful tool to have in one’s back pocket.

I may be the only one here who doesn’t care what happened to Kirito’s assailant. Until the show gives me reason to believe otherwise, I’m going to assume 1)Asuna called the police and 2)he’s in jail; the end.

Finally, I’m interested in the fact that Kayaba Akihito had a lover; they may have revealed that before, but this is the first time I remember it coming up. It would be easy to assume that Akihito was an angry loner who was lashing out at society, but the show has always portrayed him as more nuanced than that; granted, the dude straight-up murdered 4,000 people and viewers should always keep that in mind, but I appreciate what an interesting character he is regardless. It’s interesting how he, and his dream of an imaginary castle in the sky, continue to affect the world of SAO even years after his death.

My early reservations about this season have pretty much evaporated by now; now I’m interested to see how the Underworld plot is going to interface with Asuna’s plot. I don’t see any reason why Asuna couldn’t just visit Underworld in a dive, but in some ways, it might be more interesting if she remained separated from Kirito and had to fight her battle on a different front. We shall see.

LB:

Originally, I enjoyed this episode until the last five minutes or so– though, now that more has been explained to me, I’m finding myself coming around on it.

The big issue I had when I first watched this episode was that at the very end of the episode, Asuna was able to fool top-level security checks, multiple times mind you, simply by having Yui switch the database profile photo with hers. That seemed WAY too easy for me to buy at first, but since I’ve watched this episode I’ve been told by multiple people that this is a perfectly viable way of hacking the system and it’s made even more plausible due to the fact that Yui is like a God-level AI. So yeah, never mind I guess?

Other than that, I really liked that we’re getting a break from Underworld to see what everyone else is up to. The lingering question in my mind, however, is all about the initial attack from the Laughing Coffin member that put Kirito in a coma. Was that attack pre-meditated by RATH in order to get a great test subject? Or was it just one big happy coincidence? That’s an answer that I’d really like to have about now but I’m guessing that if we ever do find out the answer, it’s not going to be for quite a while. *sighs*

Lifesong:

Japanese military is not what I expected when I asked to see the outside world, but it makes enough sense to me. I don’t know how well known the idea of an AI arms race is for most people. If you’ve never heard that term, take a moment to google it. It fits Sword Art Online and might give you some interesting thoughts to chew on.

Alicization appears to be Japan’s answer to an AI arms race. It brings a dozen new questions to the table, like what does Japan’s military want to do with these AIs? I’ve been speculating that Underworld is some sort of immortality project. Now that I know the government is behind it, that’s only one of many possibilities. Immortality doesn’t seem to be the focus.

For now I have more questions than answers about Japan’s AI goals. I can’t speculate past the political and economic powers of developing an advanced AI. It’s an interesting topic. Its inclusion elevates my curiosity for more world building. How do the rules the AI in Underworld live by fit into the larger goal of this military project?

The military twist is cool, but the real MVP this week is Asuna. Not only did Asuna manage to hack a Japanese government database with the help of her own AI, she located and infiltrated the naval base holding Kirito faster than he figured out how to cut down a tree! Who’s the OP one now?

Episode 5’s portrayal of hacking was fantastic. Step 1: Change the picture in a database. Step 2: Walk in and pretend like you belong until you do your thing. I appreciate how down to earth that is. No fancy pseudo-science hacking magic, just some plain old BSing.

Speaking of BSing… Whatever happened to the guy who stabbed Kirito? The story hasn’t acknowledged his existence beyond what he did in episode one. Did Asuna go into berserker mode and beat him senseless? Did that stab wound from Kirito somehow take him out? Maybe a wild AR Pokemon hacked into his brain and put him into sleep mode until the plot remembers his relevance? I don’t need that explained now, but it feels odd that it wasn’t mentioned.

I felt like this episode did a great job of bridging Kirito’s stabbing and catching us up with Asuna and friends. I wonder if Asuna will be able to jump into Underworld? But I need more information to speculate the purpose of Underworld. Developing AI makes sense, but why is Kirito needed? Maybe that’s Kikuoka’s whim more so than anything else? The episode title for next week leads me to believe we will get some more answers ASAP. I can speculate more after that.

Otakusphere (not) Weekly Episode #31: The Asuna Infiltration

Another week, another episode spent talking about seasonal anime. LB and I actually had some other things to discuss; unfortunately, silly Lifesong is busy playing video games instead of stuffing his face with anime and LNs. What’s up with that? How dare he take care of his mental health at the expense of his otaku street cred? Newb.

Now that we’re getting used to using this new format, there are some things to be aware of. Some of you have already noticed, but the episodes sometimes go up on Youtube a little while before I have a chance to make a post for them. So if you want to listen to new episodes ASAP, you can subscribe on Youtube. However, they never go up more than maybe a day earlier, so it’s not really a big deal either way.

Got any questions for us? Feel free to let us know in the comments. If we get some good questions, maybe we’ll take a break from seasonal chatting one of these days and do a good old-fashioned listener questions episode. Actually, that sounds fun, so if you guys don’t give us any good questions, I’ll probably just make up some.

That Time I Got Reincarnated As A Slime, Episode 5

After last week’s lackluster episode, it was a nice surprise to see the show mix things up this week. Rimiru gets put into situations where his Godlike combat abilities don’t really help him, and it’s interesting to see him muddle his way through problems where there’s no easy win button.

Unfortunately, we start off the episode still inside the Elf Hostess Club, so there’s a little bit more about how boobs are just the greatest thing. Look, if you’ve read anything on this blog before, then you probably know I’m not against fan service on general principle; it has a role to play. If an entire scene is just fan service and has little else going on though, I start to get bored. This whole Elf bar is basically just Rimiru thinking to himself “OMG I really like boobs,” and it’s old already. There are seriously like 40 characters pictured in the OP who haven’t even been introduced yet, we don’t have time for this nonsense.

Anyway, finally we move on from cleavage when one of the Elves offers to tell Rimuru’s fortune, using a crystal ball, and shows him the one he’s “destined to be with.” I could complain that having a fortune teller introduce the female lead this way seems like lazy writing, but let’s see what happens; maybe not all is as it seems. It could be that Rimiru is “destined” to be with this girl in a different sense than the one he’s imagining. In any case, the girl we see is likely the girl who we saw in the first scene of the anime during World War II, so I’m glad the show has remembered that she exists. I really am curious what her deal is.

To quote Deadpool, “That’s just lazy writing.”

Then we meet evil minister Vesta, sworn enemy of Kaijin, Rimiru’s Dwarf blacksmith friend. Vesta is making a big show of being annoyed that Kaijin dared bring “a monster” into such a fine drinking establishment, then dumps his wine over Rimiru’s head as an insult. What’s worse is, he does it with no regard for the Elf girl who’s lap Rimiru is currently sitting on. It’s good to know that Vesta is the kind of guy who’s mean to people in the service industry for no reason, because that means I don’t need to have any sympathy for him whatsoever. Kaijin tries to argue later that Vesta actually isn’t such a bad guy, and Rimiru and I are both like “I’m going to stop you right there.”

Thankfully, Kaijin is even more offended by this behavior than I am and punches Vesta hard in the face, twice! Rimiru advises Kaijin “Not the face! Go for the body!,” which made me laugh out loud, because that’s exactly the kind of advice my Mom used to give me in case I ever needed to beat someone up in school. Look, there were bullies, okay? It was self-defense. Realizing he’s probably just ended his career in Dwarf Kingdom, Kaijin offers his services as a craftsman to Rimiru, who’s of course all for it. That’s awfully convenient for our favorite slime, but if it keeps the plot moving (and gets us out of the friggin’ Elf bar), I won’t complain.

The camera slows down just to make this punch extra satisfying. Thank you, Mr. Director.

Apparently you can’t just go around knocking out political officials in this world, or anywhere really, so Kaijin, Rimiru and co. all get thrown in jail. Kaijin exposits about Vesta’s dark history with the Magisoldier project, which looks like some incredibly messed up piece of quasi-demonic engineering. Seriously, this episode of That Time I Got Reincarnated As A Slime became Evangelion for about five seconds there, and I was confused, but pretty into it. Anyway, Vesta is still steamed that he failed in creating Eva Unit 01 and blames Kaijin for it, hence their beef. Interesting world building, although I’m not sure it entirely jibes with everything we’ve seen so far. For one thing, they have lab coats in this world? Seems kind of anachronistic.

Our heroes get thrown into a ridiculous kangaroo court, where even their representation has been bought off, and it looks like everybody is about to sentenced to decades of forced labor. I think the Dwarven Kingdom is supposed to be relatively advanced compared to the rest of the world in this anime, but damn, their justice system still needs some work. It doesn’t end up mattering though, because the Dwarf King, Gazel Dwargo, sees through all the nonsense and changes the sentence to simple exile, which allows Kaijin and co. to start a new life away from Dwarfland and their stupid shadow- military-industrial complex. Yaaaay monarchy! This may seem like proof that Dwargo is benevolent, but as we soon learn, Dwargo knows who Rimiru is; it may have been a defensive move. Because if he and his friends got unfairly sentenced like that, I really can’t think of anything that could stop Rimiru from Water Blading everyone in the room to death.

Gazel Dwargo is kind of like one of those grand kings from Game of Thrones, only– you know– competent.

I really like the fact that actions have consequences on this show, even seemingly small ones. Apparently Dwargo was clued into Rimiru’s significance by the fact this random slime just conjured a bunch of 100% effective healing potion effectively from nothing; people should take notice of that sort of thing. In most anime, I think creating that bucket of healing potion last episode would have been completely forgotten, but not here.

Minister Vesta gets his just desserts, since Dwargo is on to him and is pissed off that his relationship with Rimiru, Slime God, got off on a bad foot because of all this silliness. Maybe Vesta will learn to be nice to waiters now, but I doubt it. Anyway, since Kaijin’s friends are all coming along for the ride, Rimiru has accomplished his goal of acquiring Dwarven craftsmen, and is ready to head back to Goblin Village.

Damn, the first five minutes of next episode are probably going to be spent on the dwarves ogling the curvy female goblins, won’t they? I really hope not, but I think I know which show I’ve signed up for by now. I’ll have to steel myself to resist this shameless pro-boob propaganda.