Spring 2018 Anime Season Preview

It’s been almost three months; time for a deluge of new shows, and to kiss your dreams of catching up on your anime backlog goodbye for at least another season.

Now, the intelligent, useful way to do one of these season previews is to peruse the source material for the upcoming shows; research what other anime members of the staff have worked on; learn the history of the studio, and cross-reference all of this disparate information to make some educated guesses about what kind of experiences the upcoming shows will offer. I’m not going to do that (mostly because it sounds like a lot of work), but also because I don’t want to have to download anything. Checking out the source material for anime usually means reading scanlations, and whenever I try anything like that, I end up with 14 new malware-infested browsers on my laptop that all look like they came from 1998.

All that is a roundabout way of saying that this preview is mostly research-free, and it’s only real value is highlighting what shows I’m excited for this season. However, I would like to do some episodic blogging this spring (something I haven’t done for quite a while), so I’m also going to be using this to try to figure out what I might want to cover. If you see a show listed here that you’d like to see covered in the coming months (or if I totally leave out a show you’re psyched for), please let me know in the comments. I’m not going to blog a show I have no interest in just because someone requests it, but I’ll certainly give something a try if it wasn’t on my radar previously and see what happens.

Oh, and by the way, this season looks absolutely insane. The number of popular series with continuations and spinoffs airing is way above normal, and a lot of fans are probably going to have trouble keeping up. In fact, this is probably a really bad time for me to dive back into anime coverage just for that reason, but oh well, here we are somehow.

Full Metal Panic: Invisible VictoryAfter hibernating (and haunting fake anime charts) for about a decade, the fact that there’s a new FMP series coming out now is a miracle only slightly less impressive than the Biblical Parting of the Red Sea, so I should probably take notice. I’ve never been able to get into Full Metal Panic!; I don’t dislike it, but the episodes I’ve seen never quite sucked me in. However, my husband is a big fan, and if I’m not watching FMP, our dinner conversation might get awkward, so I’m probably going to catch up on the earlier seasons before the premiere if I get a chance.

Chances I will blog it: High, because it might win me brownie points with my husband, which I need; I make him eat a lot of tofu.

Sword Art Online Alternative: Gun Gale Online

I like Sword Art Online. Always have. *dodges rotten tomatoes.* No seriously, I do. Sometimes it’s juvenile and silly, but then they’ll throw you a Mother’s Rosario arc and you realize you’re actually watching a warmer-and-fuzzier Ghost in the Shell with lovely colors, and it’s really cool. Gun Gale Online was not one of my favorite parts of SAO thus far, so I don’t know if I’m going to be able to get that caught up in a side story that takes place in that particular game world. Still, my general positive disposition towards the franchise means that I plan to give it at least a few episode to impress me.

Chances I will Blog It: Medium. Really depends on whether or not the characters grab me, because GGO isn’t much of a draw in and of itself.

My Hero Academia Season 3

I watched the first episode of MHA when it came out and it didn’t do much for me; like Full Metal Panic!, I thought it was perfectly competent, but it didn’t seem like my cup of tea. Fast-forward a year or two later and everyone’s ridiculously psyched about this series, so it’s possible I missed something here. I’d like to go back and catch up on it before the third season premiere, but I’m already doing that with FMP, so I might not have enough time. I’m tempted to give it a shot anyway though; despite my general contrariness, for once I feel like it might be nice to be on the same hype train as everyone else.

Besides, this is the series with the frog girl, right? She’s cute. I want to know what’s going on with frog girl.

Chances I will Blog it: If I devote the time to actually catch up on it before April, then I’ll pretty much have to blog it to justify the time investment. Yes, I know that’s an example of the sunk-cost logical fallacy, but I never let logic get in the way of my aniblogging.

Card Captor Sakura: The Clear Card Arc (continuation)

I’ve been enjoying the return of Sakura, even though the show seems to lack a sense of urgency. It’s basically a pastoral slice of life show, then something weird will happen and Sakura will say “Oh right, magic exists,” she’ll capture a card, and then go back to lazy slice-of-life fun. It’s also very consistently repeating events from the original series, in a very self-aware way, which leads me to wonder what the point is.

It could just be, “Hey, remember the aquarium episode in the original series? Remember how cute it was? Well here, have another one!” but I think the show is doing something more sophisticated than that…like some magical entity is purposely making Sakura relive her card capturing adventures in order to mold her into something. So I guess it does have a sense of urgency, after all, but in a kind of odd, roundabout way?

Chances I’ll blog it: Low. If I wanted to blog this show I should have started with the winter season anyway, and as much as I love CCSak overall, I don’t know if I’d have much to say about these episodes. They’re oddly vacant….

Food Wars: The Third Plate (continuation)

I’ve been tiding myself over with Ms. Koizumi Loves Ramen Noodles, but I’m happy for the return of Food Porn: The Anime. There’s all sorts of drama now with Erina, Erina’s Evil Dad, Soma’s Absent Daddy, and so on and so forth, but I honestly don’t care as long as they keep preparing amazing food in ridiculous levels of detail. I’m sure some time this season will be dedicated to the plot, but honestly, the worst thing Food Wars! could do would be to start taking itself too seriously and forget that what it really is, at heart, is the show you watch when you’re trying to decide what you feel like having for dinner.

Chances I’ll blog it: High, because I’ve done it before and had fun, and because somewhere inside me is a frustrated food blogger. That frustrated food blogger usually wants to kill me for going vegan, by the way, so I should probably give her some kind of expressive outlet for my own safety.

Hoozuki’s Coolheadedness: Season 2 (continuation)

I feel guilty about this one. I really liked the first season, but when the first cour of S2 aired, I was preoccupied and didn’t get around to it. Then Sentai Filmworks decided that Amazon wasn’t their friend anymore and took all their shows off of Amazon video, and now I don’t have access to it. I guess I really need to sign up for HIDIVE one of these days.

Still, I’m excited that this show’s coming back, and I’m definitely going to catch up soon (possibly after giving myself a migraine from shotgunning FMP and MHA back-to-back?). There just isn’t any other show that meets the description of “Like Japanese Dilbert, only in Hell, with fairy tale characters and talking dogs and stuff.”

Chances I’ll blog it: Low, because I don’t feel qualified. This show draws pretty heavily from Japanese mythology, and I feel like you’d have to be pretty knowledgeable about all that rich lore to be able to do the show justice. I mean, I guess I could do actual research to write about it…waitaminute, I hate doing research…but it’s Hoozuki! I’ll do research if it’s for my darling Hoozuki…possibly? Kind of on the fence here.

Steins;Gate: 0

It’s weird: as much as I enjoyed Steins;Gate, I’m having a hard time convincing myself that I want any more of it. The other shows in the Science Adventure series that I’ve tried haven’t impressed me, and the fact that the original series was as good as it was may have been something of a fluke. It’s one of those situations where I feel like the original 24 episodes are in a perfect little world of their own and I don’t want anything else to besmirch it; a snobby opinion, perhaps, but sometimes that’s how I feel.

But I do like Okarin and Kurisu, and if I like the characters, then I should be interested in seeing more of them, right? I’ll give this a try, but if I’m not feeling good about it from the word go, I’m prepared to drop it and pretend it doesn’t exist. Seriously, if you try to talk to me about Steins;Gate 0 and I’ve stopped watching it, I’m going to play dumb and pretend I have no idea what you’re even talking about.

Chances I’ll blog it: Unless I fall in love with Okarin all over again, low.

High School DXD Hero

I’ve seen a few bits and pieces of this series here and there, but never sat down to watch it seriously. It’s a fanservice-heavy show, which isn’t an immediate bar to my watching it, but it just never seemed quite in my wheelhouse. That said, I do tend to like stories about demons and their ilk (I write about them after all), and since this series clearly isn’t going away anytime soon, maybe I should get on board?

This is what though, the fourth season of this we’re up to now? No way am I actually catching up on this the diligent way. I think I’ll watch the first episode, then read episode summaries on a wiki or something and pretend I watched it all. Only you need ever know the truth, dear readers.

Chances I’ll blog it: Low, but you never know.

Persona 5: The Animation

I really enjoyed Persona 3 Portable and Persona 4:The Golden (and come to think of it, I should do some blogging about them one of these days), so I’d love to play P5. I just don’t know when I’m going to get around to it; it’s hard to find a spare hundred hours for a meaty JRPG these days, you know? Especially when you’re spending all your free time shotgunning anime you should have already watched years ago.

I’m probably going to put this on hold until after I’ve played the game, because I want to experience the story through the game itself rather than letting an adaptation spoil that experience for me. That said, I don’t know if I’ll be able to work a P5 playthrough into my schedule until about 2033, so it’s within the realm of possibility that I will never watch this. Sigh.

Chances I’ll blog it: Low to the point of nonexistence.

Amanchu! Advance

The first season of Amanchu! was fun at times, but here’s the annoying thing about it: in a show ostensibly about scuba diving, they didn’t go scuba diving until the last episode. It made logical sense that the newbie diver needed to learn the ropes first, which is what most of the season focused on, and the show was just charming enough to get away with it, but still, it felt a little cheap.

Now, with Season 2, I don’t want to see any pussy-footing around. Those girls better get suited up and get their scuba on from the first episode, because the show is all out of excuses for lollygagging. I want to like this, but I swear, if they give us another one of those boring episodes where the kids play Red-Light-Green-Light in the school parking lot because they have nothing better to do, I’m dropping this hard.

Chances I’ll blog it: High, because if they do go scuba diving a lot I’ll want an excuse to talk about scuba diving, and if they don’t go scuba diving, I’ll want an excuse to complain about that some more– because apparently, this is a very big deal to me. I don’t know why either.

Binan Konkou Chikyuu Bouei-bu Happy Kiss

I watched the first season of this, which is about 11 more episodes of it than I should have watched. Once you get used to the idea that the show is a gender-swapped parody of Sailor Moon, there’s really not much else there; it’s basically just telling the same joke over and over again.

This is the third season, with new characters, so there’s potential for something different to happen, but I’m not expecting much. I’ll give the first episode a shot, but if it’s still doing more of the same, I see no reason to continue. Maybe it’s worth watching if seeing the guys prance around in tights works for you as fanservice (not that there’s anything wrong with that), but I can’t think of another reason to watch this.

Chances I’ll blog it: negligible.

Comic Girls

For many years, I wanted to be a comic artist. The idea of being able to go live in an all-girls comic artists’ dormitory was pretty much my dream life as a teenager, so I’m more psyched for this show than just about anything else this season. If it’s good, there’s a chance it will dredge up long-buried memories of manga-drawing ambitions and I’ll be reduced to a sobbing mess on the floor by the time the credits roll, but maybe that will ultimately be good for me. After all, if you’re crying, that means you’re growing as a person or something, right?

Anyway, I hope they focus more on the manga aspect and less on the general “bunch of cute girls living in close proximity” humor, which I can get elsewhere. I’m going to be disappointed if a lot of the run time is taken up by the girls taking baths, borrowing towels, exchanging bath salts, or doing other bath-related activities. I’ve watched Hidamari Sketch, and I know how this kind of thing tends to go down.

Chances I’ll blog it: Oh, it is on like Donkey Kong. Expect 5000 word write-ups on the regular; am I kidding? HA HAH I don’t even know

Tachibana-kan to Lie Angle

This is another show about girls living in a dormitory, only without the manga angle. So this is ideally where all the bath-related plots should take place, instead of on Comic Girls’: if they want to spend the whole show bathing, making curry and dressing each other up, I’m alright with that. Everything in its right place.

That said, “girls live in dormitory, wacky hijinks ensue!” isn’t much to go on. At best we could get another HidaSketch or Kiniro Mosaic or something like that, or we might end up with something like this season’s Slow Start, functional light comedy without really standing out. Right now, all over the world, the 12 people who really like Slow Start are shaking their fists at me through the screen, I can feel it, but I will continue on, uncowed and unrepentant.

Chances I’ll blog this: Really low, unless Comic Girls pisses me off by being too generic, in which case I’ll switch to blogging this show entirely out of spite.

Uma Musume: Pretty Derby

Okay so, let me get this straight…this anime is about girls, who are horses, so they have cute horsie ears and tails. And they also race, what being horses and all, and they also sing and dance and get all dressed up in pretty dresses because why not?

That’s…that’s just My Little Pony. They just re-invented My Little Pony from this weird sideways direction, but that’s what it is. Now, you could protest by saying “but My Little Pony isn’t sexual like this!” in which case you would be demonstrating profound ignorance of today’s MLP fanbase.

Shows like this usually aren’t half as outrageous as the premise makes them sound, and they’re usually the worse for it, but I’ll give it a try anyway. Maybe I’ll spin it that because I feel alienated in modern MLP fandom, this is the level I’ve been reduced to; watching adaptations of cell phone games about two-legged horse girls.

Chances I’ll blog this: Medium. It’ll be worth doing if the show actually embraces it’s own ridiculousness and really goes for it, instead of just doing the kind of lukewarm, not-really-naughty humor that could be done anywhere.

Hisone to Masotan

I saw “Air Force” in the description and figured this was going to be another one of those military girl shows, like Kantai Collection or High School Fleet. However, this show is adding a dragon to the mix. That sounds…like a really good idea, actually. How has no one thought of this before? Game of Thrones has been on for like 8 years, and it seems like writers are still kind of waking up to the idea that viewers really, really like dragons.

This one is written by Mari Okada, which might be a useful bit of info for some people, but it tells me absolutely nothing. I’ve seen Okada stuff that I thought was great, yet some of the most painfully awful anime I’ve ever seen has been Okada-penned, so she’s a wildcard. I don’t know if it’s that her quality is wildly variable, or if it has more to do with how some of her scripts have been directed, but her presence on the staff just increases the “wtf is this even and where did it come from?” factor that this show has for me.

All that aside, the art style looks reminiscent of decades past rather than the 2010s, and that intrigues me. I think they’re trying to invoke the Ghibli-classic feel here, and I’m curious to see if they can live up to it.

Magical Girl Ore

This is the first show that Crunchyroll announced for this season, so if nothing else, it’ll be easy to find. It’s a magical girl show, with a twist that the magical girl transforms into a muscular guy when she powers up. My gut feeling is that it’ll be amusing for about one episode, then become dull in the same way Binan High did. There’s something about idols and yakuza thrown in here as well, so maybe it’ll have enough zany appeal to stay fun after the premiere episode.

I have mixed feelings about these gender-bending magical girl shows. I get how they’re a natural progression of the genre in a lot of ways, and how they can be incredibly refreshing for people who are tired of traditional gender roles, and that’s all good. I just never find these shows as interesting or funny as I feel like I’m supposed to. Maybe I’m just not the target audience, and that’s okay.

Mahou Shoujo Site

This sounds a lot like Magical Girl Raising Project from a few years back: an incredibly dark, gritty magical girl show where love and children’s dreams go to die. I don’t have a problem with the recent trend of “dark and gritty” magical girl shows on principle; diversity within the genre is good, after all. But I’d be lying if I said I found any of those post-Madoka Magika shows particularly watchable. Madoka aside, which is an exceptional case on a lot of different levels, my taste in magical girl anime tends more towards the sweet and fluffy; I want to be reminded of my childhood, not convinced that my childhood was all a lie and the only way forward is the sweet release of oblivion, you know?

Still, I’ll give it a try. Maybe this show will have some element that MGRP didn’t have that will hook me.

Chances I’ll blog it: Very low.

Devil’s Line

Vampire show. I’m tempted to say “look, it’s anime Twilight!” except that would be closed-minded, right? I mean, the concept of vampires existed long, long before the Twilight boom, and to call every new property with a romance between a vampire and a human “like Twilight” is ignorant and reductive, right? Vampire literature is a broad sub-genre with it’s own tropes, and that should be respected.

Except this vampire dude saves a girl, and forms a bond with her…only, being close to her might test his stern resolve to never, ever drink human blood…

Yeah, it’s goddamned anime Twilight. Not that that’s a bad thing; this could be a lot of fun, repurposing old gifs from the Twi movies, photoshopping Robert Pattinson’s head on top of the main dude in every screenshot, etc. This could be the most fun I’ve had blogging since taking the piss out of Wizard Barristers every week. But should such behavior really be encouraged?

Chances I will blog it: High, for the wrong reasons.

Golden Kamuy

Historical; takes place shortly after the Russo-Japanese war, in Hokkaido. I had no idea this was coming out until five seconds before writing this post, but now I’m intrigued. First, you’ve got the Hokkaido factor, and once A Place Further Than the Universe completes, I’ll want another show that takes place somewhere cold and snowy. Second, the female character is Ainu, and despite many references to the Ainu and their culture, I don’t think I’ve ever watched an anime with an explicitly Ainu character; I feel like I MUST have, but I can’t think of one off the top of my head.

So it’s historical, it’s winter-wonderland-zoned, it’s an opportunity to learn, what more could you want? I usually hate categorizing shows into anime for smart people and dumb people (because lord knows, I am a HUGE fan of some dumb, dumb shows), but like Showa Genroku Rakugo Shinju, this kind of sounds like anime aimed at a more cerebral audience.

Chances I’ll blog it: High.

Piano no Mori

There’s an old piano in the forest and a poor kid plays it, then a rich kid wants to play it but the magical forest piano doesn’t like him as much, maybe? I’m a little unclear on whether the piano is magical or not. I’ll confess, my main interest in this show is the fact that the preview describes one of the characters as “practically breast-fed by the piano as the son of a family of prestigious pianists,” and now I can’t stop wondering what it would look like for a Grand Piano to breastfeed someone. Would you put the baby on the keys, or…?

At the very least, this show will probably be really interesting for people who have experience playing piano; how much appeal it’ll have beyond that, I wonder. Supposedly the manga is highly-regarded and it’s already been adapted into a successful film version, so there’s probably something interesting going on here. I feel like this one is easy to overlook among all the flashier stuff this season, so I’m going to try to give it a proper chance to hook me.

Chances I’ll blog it: low.

Wotaku ni Koi wa Muzuashii

This covers a romance between two otaku, a fujoshi and a gamer. My immediate thought is that it’s in friendly competition with Recovery of an MMO Junkie for the title of sweetest romcom between two nerds, but maybe sweetness isn’t even what it’s going for; we’ll see. On the plus side, unlike MMO Junkie, chances are the director of this one isn’t an absolute raging anti-Semite, so that’s a step in the right direction.

I want to be excited for this, because it could be really entertaining if done well, but something inside me is urging caution. I mean, I’m an otaku who married another otaku, so it would be nice to see that dynamic explored, but I don’t know if this is going to be the series to properly do it.

Chances I’ll blog it: Medium-high, since I can probably use posts about this show to rant about the otaku stuff going on in my own life and make it seem like I’m staying on topic, almost.

Alice or Alice

This is the show this season for people with Lolita complexes, because there’s always one. It’s only relevance to me is that it’ll act like a black hole of negativity, drawing all the self-righteous contempt and vitriol of the entire anime blogosphere to it, like moths to a flame, then hopefully I can watch the shit I want to watch in relative peace.

Okay, maybe that’s not fair. Just because the show has lolicon doesn’t mean it has nothing else to offer; a lot of shows appeal to the loli-loving demographic while providing something else to a different audience (Non Non Biyori immediately comes to mind.) But the fact that the show also appears to be an incest fantasy makes it hard for me to imagine that it’s going to offer much outside of taboo sexual situations.

And don’t get me wrong, if that’s your thing, that’s fine; I know a lot of people enjoy depictions of taboo situations because they’re taboo, and it doesn’t mean they condone the same behavior in real life. But this show is targeted at a specific audience that I am not a part of.

Chances I’ll blog it: Low, unless a secret lolicon billionaire gets involved and pays me to document the exploits of the two Alices. C’mon, Mark Zuckerberg, you know you want it.

Kakuriyo no Yadomeshi

I feel like I’ve already seen this show about fifteen times, probably because I’ve seen so many shows that take place in and around Shinto shrines. This seems like a Shinto shrine show crossed with The Ancient Magus Bride, meaning it’s creepy, and we’re all kind of on the fence about whether or not it’s creepy in a good, self-aware “we are examining the psychological ramifications of this creepiness” way, or just plain regular creepy. I have a feeling the fact that one of the neighborhood demons wants to take the main girl as his bride isn’t going to come up much after the first episode, but that plot point is going to effect how a lot of people judge this show early on.

Forced marriage aside, I tend to like these kinds of supernatural shrine-hijinks shows, so I’m cautiously enthusiastic for this one. With any luck it’ll be a slightly more adult version of Gingitsune, because I’ll watch anything that’s similar to Gingitsune.

Amai Choubatsu: Watashi wa Kanshu Senyou Pet

Wait, I was wrong before: THIS is the show that’s going to draw all the vitriol of animebloggers. Because unlike Alice or Alice, which at least deals with a specific fetish of a relatively small group, this show looks like it actually deals with female sexuality, and nothing scares culture bloggers half as much as female sexuality.

As the “pet” of a sadistic prison guard, the protagonist of this story is being dominated by a handsome man, which is a fantasy for many, many women. However, rather than acknowledging that this fantasy exists, and has logical reasons for existing, people are going to freak out that the show is “teaching” young girls that they want to be dominated. That is bass-ackwards, but whatever, let’s just pretend this is a problem with the mass media brainwashing girls. Never mind the fact that Wuthering Heights was a pretty big thing back before there was a lot of media around, and all of this stuff is ultimately derivative of Wuthering Heights and other gothic romances from that era.

To be honest, the show itself sounds like it’ll probably be pretty boring, unless you’re really into this particular fantasy; I doubt I’ll watch past the first episode. But it bugs me a little that it’s probably going to get critically crucified for the wrong reasons.

Chances I’ll blog this: Low, unless other anibloggers absolutely lose their shit condemning this show, in which case I will begin waving a flag of support just to be a pain in the ass. Sometimes, I can be a petty person.

Butlers: Chitose Momotose Monogatari

I have mixed feelings about this. It’s a show about handsome butlers, one of whom is a specialist in cafe latte art(!), but they also travel through time and fight supernatural battles and stuff. It’s like, can’t I just have a show about handsome butlers working in a cafe, serving delicious coffee? Why do they have to have superpowers and shit? You’re trying too hard!

Hopefully the show will win me over to the point that I actually enjoy the supernatural aspect and don’t just see it as a wasted opportunity to explore the refined world of handsome men in nice suits making latte art. I want to make some sort of comment here about how a show about butlers being butlers should be enough, but then again, the last anime that focused on maids was also about giant dragons fighting each other with god-tier magic, so maybe this is something about anime that I just have to accept.

Chances I’ll blog it: High. This wasn’t something I was really anticipating until just now, but something tells me this might be a lot of fun to cover.

Rokuhoudou Yotsuiro Biyori

…Oh. Here’s another show about handsome men serving drinks, so maybe I shouldn’t be so upset that Butlers won’t spend all it’s time on coffee shop life.

It’s four hot guys working in a tea shop, so due to the Immutable Law of Karen that I will watch any anime that takes place in a coffee shop, I am contractually obligated to watch all of this (and yes, I know it’s a tea shop and not a coffee shop, but c’mon.) I’m expecting a soothing, healing anime with a healthy side of food porn, and I’ll be a little miffed if I don’t get exactly that.

Chances I’ll blog this: Low, because I’ll probably have more to say about Butlers and doing both could be redundant.

Waka Okami wa Shougakusei

A young girl loses her parents and is forced to move into her grandma’s hot spring inn, where she learns to take over the family business. This sounds a lot like the premise of Hanasaku Iroha, a very pretty and extraordinarily tedious show from a few years back that I watched all of, for some reason. The art style leads me to believe that this show is going to be a bit more energetic than Hanasaku Iroha, which can only be a good thing. It also has ghosts, which is probably a plus, assuming the ghosts bathe in the hot springs at some point.

It seems like there’s going to be a lot of overlap between this show and Kakuriyo no Yadomeshi, with this one targeted a little younger. That said, the two shows could be very different tonally, so the similarities may be superficial.

Chances I’ll blog it: Low. I’m actually looking forward to watching it, but I don’t think it’s going to lend itself to posting. We’ll see.

Tada-kun wa Koi wo Shinai

“Mitsuyoshi Tada, a boy who has never known love, is taking pictures of the cherry blossoms in full bloom when he meets Teresa Wagner, a transfer student from Luxembourg. Upon arriving in Japan, she got lost, separated from her travel companion. Mitsuyoshi helps her and brings her to his grandfather’s coffee shop.”

COFFEE SHOP!? I’m on it!

It looks like a really cute romance story. Now, the question is, will it be centered around said grandfather’s coffee shop? Or do they just go to the coffee shop once or twice? I have no way of knowing yet, but I know I need to find out.

Chances I’ll blog it: Medium. I didn’t have plans for it before checking out the PV, but it just looks really pretty and soothing.

Jikken-hin Kazoku: Creatures Family Days

Crazy-abusive scientist parents turn their kids into demi-humans, and after they get arrested, the one normal kid has to try to teach the others how to integrate into human society….

…well. That’s a premise you don’t see everyday.

I would say this is just another show in the Cute Monster Girls subgenre, except one of the kids is a monster boy, so that’s novel. I’m kind of intrigued by the parents: what was their motivation for experimenting on their own children? Why did they think they were justified in doing so? Unfortunately I think the parents are going to be shuffled off into a dark corner (which, to be fair, is where they belong) while the monster-kids take the spotlight, so I’ll probably never get answers to my questions.

Chances I’ll blog it: Low. It could be a perfectly fine comedy/slice of life with supernatural characters, but the stuff I actually find interesting about the premise is probably going to be ignored on the show. I will be happy to be proven wrong about that, however.

Caligula

A virtual idol gains sentience based on feedback from her users, decides humanity is suffering, and traps humans inside a dream world to save them from their suffering. *sigh*

No, I’m not sighing because that sounds bad. Actually, I think the premise is intriguing and has a lot of potential. It’s just that ambitious, high-concept anime always seem to disappoint me lately, and the stuff that really resonates with me has a super-dull premise like “four girls hang out in the country” or “two MMO players form a relationship.” Girls Last Tour was high-concept, but that’s the odd exception.

I’ll try it to see if it has anything to offer, but I’m expecting it to feel pretentious and kind of boring from early on.

Chances I’ll blog it: So low.

3D Kanojo: Real Girl

An otaku ends up dating a gorgeous girl, mayhem ensues. Sounds innocuous enough, except for the references to “rough waves that beat the otaku out of him.” I really hope they’re exaggerating there, because I do not want to see otaku get beat out of anyone. Also, the capsule description includes “This is sure to be THE comedy program of 2018 that you won’t want to miss!”, which makes me want to snub it on principle.

I’m hoping the show is actually good and it’s just the people responsible for marketing it that are getting over-zealous. In a way, I think I’d prefer it if the MC gave up his hobbies to please his girlfriend, because that would be wrong, and the wrongness would make the show stand out; right now I’m expecting a painfully generic romcom with copious references to “save points” and “flags.”

Chances I’ll blog it: Only if it’s so horrible that so-bad-it’s-good applies…which means there’s a decent chance, actually.

Koneko no Chii Ponpora Dairyokou

I love the anime for Chi’s Sweet Home, and I own the manga in its entirety. To be honest though, I’m a little weirded out by Chi in 3D. It’s still really cute, but for some reason I don’t find myself wanting to watch it anywhere near as much as the original. This is the second season of Chi-in-3D, and I’m still not caught up on the first season, so it’s not high on my priority list.

That said, this is one of the few anime my daughter is familiar with, and will even ask for specifically by yelling “Kitty Cat!”, and for that reason alone, it has a prominent place in my life right now. I’m probably not going to watch it as it airs, but you can be pretty darn sure it’s going to be playing in my house eventually.

Chances I’ll blog it: There’s a better chance that my 2-year-old will write about this one, but don’t count her out; she knows all her letters and everything. She’ll probably be taking over this blog by next year.


So, what do you guys think? Does it look like a good season, or just a bunch of hype that isn’t going to amount to much? Is anyone mad that I totally ignored all the sports anime? Please tell me you’re not mad, I know sports anime is important and stuff but it’s just, this post was getting SOOooo long and just looking at pictures of people kicking soccer balls and stuff was making me feel really tired.

Winter 2018 Anime and Wholesome Masculinity

One thing I’ve talked about before is that while today’s critics love to talk about “toxic masculinity,” in popular media, no one ever seems to call attention to it when we get the opposite of that. Now I guess it’s nice if a show doesn’t have toxic masculinity at all (depending on what that even means.) But let’s go one step further: what if a show not only avoids toxic, evil, ugly masculinity, but instead has wholesome, healing, warm-and-fuzzy masculinity? Is that even possible?

Because, it could just be me– or more specifically, it could just be the shows I’ve chosen to watch this season. But it feels like, this anime season, there are a whole lot of male characters who are portrayed as masculine while still being allowed to be compassionate, vulnerable, nurturing people; furthermore, these traits are seen as being part of their masculine nature, not exceptions to it. I can’t be the only one who’s noticed.

Before we go any further, important disclaimer: I haven’t been watching everything this season. Maybe if I watch DARLING in the FRANXX, it’ll turn out to be a bunch of shirtless dudes beating their chests and firing machine guns or something? (I admit, I have no idea what that show’s about.) I’m just calling attention to a pattern, not claiming that it covers every anime airing.

With that out of the way, here’s a list of shows this season that feature “wholesome masculinity;” a term I coined because “wholesome” is an antonym for “toxic.” The fact that I had to invent a term for it is kind of interesting by itself.

March Comes in Like A Lion— You could probably talk about masculinity in relation to almost every arc on this show, but I’m going to focus on the recent bullying arc. When one of the Kawamoto sisters is bullied in school, main dude Rei takes it upon himself to help her, only to confront his own powerlessness. At first he thinks of ripping apart the bullies “limb from limb,” but realizes that even if he were actually to do such an absurd thing, it wouldn’t help Hina at all; just present her with a different kind of problem. He then considers using his money (since, as a pro Shogi player, Rei has a lot more cash than a boy his age typically would), only to realize his mistake; even if he were to give Hina money for a private school or private tutors, she wouldn’t accept it, and he’s not going to try to trample her pride. Basically, he soon realizes that force, in any form, won’t solve anything.

While the failure of his early attempts at helping Hina do frustrate him, instead of letting that frustration fester, he eventually comes up with another solution; to simply be there for Hina, as much as possible. He’s there for her in a very physical sense, showing up while she’s on a school trip in Kyoto just to say hi and give her some medicine. But he doesn’t shadow her, doesn’t overstep his bounds; simply lets her know that he’s there for her, and demonstrates it repeatedly. When the bullying situation is eventually resolved by the school administration, Rei is left feeling like he didn’t do enough for Hina; naturally, she knows better.

I don’t want to say that serving as a pillar of support for someone else is a uniquely masculine trait, because that’s clearly not true. However, there is something masculine to me about Rei’s way of going about it; what he primarily offers is his very presence, his physical constancy. He can’t really help Hina by talking out her problems with her (he doesn’t know what to say), but he can help by simply being there when his presence might offer some comfort. That kind of silent vigil, as though saying “I won’t interfere in your life because I know it’s not my place, but I will ALWAYS be there for you, even if being there is literally all I can do,” is a way of using your power to help protect someone while making sure that they won’t ever feel like they need protection from you. It’s the “toxic” idea of the controlling/dominating male turned inside out.

It’s driving me crazy that I can’t find a reference to the quote anywhere now, but I could swear I remember reading that Kentarou Miura, creator of Berserk, once said that March Comes in Like a Lion was one of the “manliest” manga around. It seemed like an odd take at the time, especially considering the source, but I think I’m beginning to see what Miura meant.

Sanrio Boys–As an advertisement for Sanrio products, I’m not sure if this show is working out so hot; we don’t learn a whole lot about the different brand characters, and the episodes tend to fall on the dull side. The show’s overall quality aside though, it makes a few important points about masculinity, and does so repeatedly.

There’s the most basic message, which is that males who like cute or “girly” things don’t have to be any less masculine than males who don’t; an appreciation of something traditionally feminine does not cancel out masculinity, and boys should not carry around any fear that it somehow might. However, the situation is complicated by the fact that all of the Sanrio characters represent points of vulnerability for the main characters. For Kouta, Pompompurin represents his bond with his grandmother, and his fear that he let her down before she died; for Seiichirou, a driven overachiever who is pushed hard by his father, Cinamoroll represents the care-free childhood he was forced to abandon too fast. Each boy has a similar story.

The Sanrio charms the boys carry around aren’t just cute tchotchkes they collect as a hobby, but constant reminders of their vulnerabilities. Once you get past the “it’s okay for a dude to have a Hello Kitty keychain” level, the show really seems to be about how becoming stronger is about accepting and embracing your vulnerabilities, not running from them; that you don’t truly become strong until you stop being afraid of weakness.

Appropriately Ryou, the least traditionally masculine looking of all the boys, has the most problems with accepting this, because he has the most to lose. As a beautiful boy who gets babied by his older sisters, he feels like he has to fight for every shred of perceived masculinity he can get; he doesn’t think he can afford to admit to liking cute mascot characters the way the muscular guys can. When Ryou finally admits to and accepts his love of Sanrio, it seems like he’s become more mature and more manly in the process, because he’s exploring his vulnerability instead of running away from it.

As I said above, it’s probably not a great show. But as a delivery vehicle for the message “Masculinity doesn’t have to be what you always thought it was,” it might just be peerless.

How to Keep a Mummy–This show is mostly just an adorable little ray of sunshine, to be enjoyed and not really thought about much; really, I think trying to analyze this show too much would be doing it a disservice. However, that said, I don’t think I’m being too analytical by pointing out that the male characters on this show are portrayed in caretaker roles; they’re not changing diapers, exactly, but taking care of the little monsters that fall into their lives requires a fair amount of nurturing. Some are more nurturing than others, but there’s no question that they’ve been assigned caretaker roles.

Now that I think about it, it’s actually kind of surprising that this wasn’t a “cute girls doing cute things” series; seeing cute girls take care of cute little monsters sounds like it would be very marketable. In any case, I’m glad the series turned out this way instead. Mummy isn’t didactic about breaking apart old-fashioned ideas about masculinity the way Sanrio Boys is, but just by putting the boys in caretaker roles– in a rather casual way– it challenges negative masculine stereotypes. There is one female main character, but considering the fact that she isn’t treated differently at all, I don’t feel like there’s anything to add about her.

School Babysitters–Now in this anime, boys are changing diapers. Again, we have boys in nurturing caretaker roles. However, one interesting wrinkle that Mummy doesn’t cover is we get to see how the boys are perceived by their classmates as caretakers. Despite the fact that he chases after toddlers and sings lullabies all day long, Ryuuichi is considered one of the hottest guys in school by his female classmates– and the other boy in the babysitting club is a close second (although Hayato isn’t such a great babysitter, but that’s a topic for another time.)

So, not only does taking care of babies fail to hurt Ryuuichi’s chances with the opposite sex, it seems to be helping; the implication is that the girls like him in no small part because he’s so demonstrably nurturing. I don’t know if it’s fair to say that the girls consider him more masculine, but they certainly consider him a nicer and more interesting person than a lot of his classmates. I don’t think the show is really trying to say “take care of babies and chicks will totally dig you, because kindness trumps toughness in manly appeal,” but hey, there are worse takeaways.

Today’s Menu for the Emiya Family– This show is an odd-duck, the oddly bucolic food-porn spin off of the Fate/Stay Night franchise. I don’t have a lot to say about it other than the fact that main guy Shirou is constantly cooking for the other people in his life; primarily women, like Rin, Saber, and Illya. Sometimes the girls cook as well, but Shirou is clearly the main chef.

Being a chef certainly isn’t anti-masculine (as watching any amount of celebrity chef television will show), but it is notable that Shirou’s whole role in this show is to provide food for the ladies in his life. Rin could be all like “Bitch, get in the kitchen and make me a sandwich!” and he would just shrug, because he’s already in the kitchen making her ten sandwiches.

Laid-Back Camp– Now we’re getting into shows that don’t even have much of a male presence, but what presence there is has some significance. There are barely any male characters in Laid-Back Camp; the only one who makes much of an impression is Rin’s grandfather, the man who gave her her first set of camping equipment. So Grandpa decides to inspire his granddaughter not by getting her some cutesy little present, but a tent. So she can go out and camp, alone, independent, in the wild.

Apparently the concept of trying to limit his granddaughter’s autonomy for her own protection has never occurred to Laid-Back Grandpa. He must have missed that day in Toxic Masculinity class.

A Place Further Than The Universe– Another show with a minimal male presence, but that absence is interesting in and of itself. The Antarctic expedition is led by women, but while the civilian expedition is considered controversial in the world of the show, the gender of the leadership seems to have nothing to do with it. People take issue with the fact that it’s a civilian expedition, or that the finances are too tight, but it doesn’t seem to have occurred to anyone to be worried that the leadership is all-female; it’s just a non-issue. You would think there would at least be that one token dude who’d say something like “In a tough place like Antarctica, you need a MAN’s strength!”, but the show doesn’t even bother with that.

I like this show, in part because it’s one of the relatively few shows where having the leads be four teen girls actually accomplishes something other than ticking a demographic box. It doesn’t have much to say about masculinity, but I think it’s worth noting that it doesn’t feel a need to, even in passing.

Ms. Koizumi Loves Ramen Noodles– Okay, including this here is really a stretch, since it’s only tangentially related to the theme of this post; maybe I’m trying to justify to myself the fact that I’m still watching it. However, I do think it’s interesting that the kind of stereotypical “dim guy who just doesn’t get that the pretty girl isn’t interested in him,” character is another girl. All of the creepy behavior targeted towards Koizumi is from Yuu, her female classmate; even when it seems like a guy is after Koizumi, it’s a false alarm and they’re more interested in the ramen she’s eating.

There is some creepy, arguably even toxic behavior on this show, but pretty much all of it comes from Yuu; the guys are pretty blameless. I think guys are sometimes surprised by how much ramen Koizumi can put away, but that has more to do with respect for the laws of physics than gender stereotypes, probably. Anyway, it’s not that this show has anything particularly meaningful to say about toxic masculinity, wholesome masculinity, or otherwise, but it’s kind of cool (in a weird way) that Yuu is providing us with some rare toxic-femininity. How’s that for representation?


So yeah. The next time I hear about how anime is just chock-full of toxic masculinity, I want to hear an explanation of this season. Like, did a whole bunch of anime writers just wake up and forget to be toxic one day? Something in the water? I need to know.