Winter 2018 Anime Impressions, Part II

This season, I find myself gravitating towards slice-of-life shows and comedies more than anything else. I know there are action shows this season that are getting people excited, but I just don’t feel the urge to watch that kind of thing right now. Maybe it’s because there’s some challenging stuff going on in my life that makes me long for the anime equivalent of comfort food, or maybe I’m just not in the mood for giant robots doing fisticuffs.

Perhaps I’ll check in with some of the flashier, high-profile shows sometime midseason, but for now, here’s the rest of the warm-and-fuzzy stuff I’ve been cozying up to.

Card Captor Sakura: Clear Card Arc– It’s impressive how good the art and animation was in the original series back in the late ’90s, because this show simultaneously looks state-of-the-art and just like the CCS you remember. Yes, there’s a bit more detail and the CGI effects for the magic are more sophisticated, but it just feels like proper CCS on some level I can’t explain– as opposed to say, Sailor Moon Crystal, which always seemed a bit off to me.

I read a little bit of the manga for this arc while it was running in Nakayoshi, and it kind of seemed like same-old, same old. Oh noes, the cards have changed again and Sakura has to hunt them all down, how can this beeeeeee? Still, it’s interesting to see the cards becoming more aggressive, like Windy becoming “Gale.” If there’s some larger theme about the stakes escalating as you get older, I’ll be impressed.

Really, the only thing I don’t like is the fact that they’ve added about a foot to Sakura’s height. I know this was to be expected, but dammit, it’s Sakura! I never wanted her to grow up to be a CLAMP Noodle Person! I feel like Sakura’s original design was like the Golden Mean or something, it was the essence of perfection the way it was and messing with it is just stupid.

“But she’s in middle school now!” you say? Yeah I don’t care, too busy making Short Sakura-chan FOREVER banners to plaster all over my neighborhood.

School Babysitters– Moe shows (or shows with cute-appeal for the uninitiated) harness our natural desire to love and protect children to get the viewers to have feelings for the characters; usually moe characters aren’t young children, but they have sufficiently childlike proportions that our protective instinct is invoked. What’s special about a show like School Babysitters is that since it’s actually about really young kids, you’re kind of cutting out the middle man: straight-up cuteness without having to do the mental gymnastics to convince yourself that everyone is really in high school or whatever.

This kind of show defies analysis, at least at this point; it’s just a piece of feel-good mind candy that makes the world a slightly better place whenever you watch it. The only thing that mars the perfection is the fact that one character hits his kid brother– and I don’t mean a spanking (where at least you are bonking the kid on their natural shock-absorber), but he hits the kid in the head. Kind of disturbing, but considering the fact that the hitting clearly creates more behavior problems than it solves, it doesn’t seem like the show is condoning this behavior; more just acknowledging that it happens.

One nitpick is that several of the kids in the daycare program look like one-year-olds and speak more like three-year-olds, but that’s the kind of thing only viewers with kids will probably notice or care about. I’m still a little bitter about Hanamaru Kindergarten from years ago, so maybe this will be the show about adorable little rugrats that pulls out all the stops.

Karakai Jozu no Takagi-san– Kind of weird that there’s no official English title for this one. This has a really simple premise: a clever girl teases the boy sitting next to her. Unbeknownst to him (but totes benownst to us) Takagi actually really likes the object of her torment, Nishikata. Nevertheless, liking him doesn’t stop her from messing with his head in every conceivable way.

This show reminds me of Tonari no Seki-kun, with it’s emphasis on two kids goofing off in the back of the classroom. However, whereas the genius of Seki-kun was that it was ambiguous how much Seki-kun was actually trying to distract Rumi, and how much he was just amusing himself, the deliberate nature of Takagi’s teasing can get kind of annoying. Considering the amount of mental anguish Nishikata goes through trying to anticipate how she’ll torture him next, sometimes she just seems like a cold bully instead of a charming scamp.

Still, considering how ingenious Takagi’s schemes are, it’s probably for the best; if she weren’t so busy teasing her crush, she’d probably be hatching supervillain-level plots to take over the world. Way to take one for the team, Nishikata.

Anyway, this one is in the “maybe I’ll keep up with it if I’m in the mood” pile. Whether or not I watch it probably depends on how nostalgic for Tonari no Seki-kun I’m feeling on any particular day.

Sanrio Boys– Considering that I was expecting this show to feel like a commercial for Sanrio products, it’s doing a pretty good job telling an actual story, albeit a simple one. I mean yeah, it is a commercial for Sanrio merch, but the main character spends the first two episodes going through an actual emotional arc and everything. Add the fact that it’s exploring the feelings of teen boys who enjoy things that are considered non-masculine, and how they reconcile that with their still-emerging gender identity, and there’s some genuinely interesting stuff here. All shows that are meant to pimp tiny little erasers and keychains should only be half this interesting.

All that said, I have personal baggage here that makes it difficult to fully enjoy Sanrio Boys. As far as I’m concerned, Badtz-Maru, the grumpy penguin, is the best Sanrio character by a country mile, and all of the other ones are just taking up space that should rightfully belong to my Badtz. As I write this, there is a Badtz-Maru plushie staring at me from the exalted shelf meant for Special Toys that Little Hands Are Not To Touch.

GREATEST. BOY
BEST. BOY.

So when the guys on this show go on about their love for Pompompurin, or Hello Kitty, it’s like, hello, aren’t you forgetting someone?!? They’ve shown Badtz-Maru briefly (in a scene using live-action footage from a Sanrio store), but he’s clearly not a favorite for any of the boys on the show, thus will likely play a diminished role, if any; we’ll be lucky to see him show up in group shots with all the Sanrio characters. He’ll probably be standing behind Keroppi and we’ll only see like, one of his hair spikes sticking out or something.

So, uh, on the one hand, this show is a pleasant surprise; on the other hand, they are not focusing on my favorite Sanrio character and thus should be punished severely. I haven’t yet figured out how this punishment will be meted out, but trust me, it will occur.

…crap, I’m going to end up buying Sanrio merchandise again thanks to this show, won’t I? Goddammit.

 

Winter 2018 Anime Impressions, Part 1

It still kind of takes me by surprise just how much new anime there is each quarter. You’d think I’d be used to it by now, but when I look at Crunchyroll’s list of updated titles at the beginning of the season, I find myself saying “Wait, that’s out? And that’s out? And that too? These are all airing this season? They’re using up all the anime, there won’t be any left for next season!” Apparently it doesn’t work that way.

I’ve watched a bunch, and still only sampled maybe half of what I’m interested in trying from this Winter Smörgåsbord; here’s what I’ve caught so far. If you’re going to use this post to help evaluate what you plan on watching, keep in mind that my biases include cute things, food porn, and uh…actually, I’m sure I must have more biases, but those are the only two that come immediately to mind.

Laid-Back Camp— My overriding thought concerning this show is “Hey, I’ll bet I can get my Dad to watch this with me!” which makes it hard to focus on much else. Still, I think there’s a little bit of a conflict here between the comfy, relaxing mood the show has going on and the inevitable cute girl antics.

Whenever main gal Rin is out camping, looking at the beautiful scenery, you feel like you can smell the smoke from the campfire, feel the warmth of being all bundled up in long underwear and sleeping bags, and the bracing, invigorating chill of cold, clean mountain air on your face, and it’s just lovely. It’s experiencing the best parts of camping without having to deal with bugs and dirt. Then the other girls come on and act quirky or whatever and you kind of want them to just shut the hell up and let Rin camp in peace. However, this is clearly a deliberate choice (especially because even Rin herself acknowledges it), so I have hope that the show is going to get better at marrying it’s soothing elements with it’s genki-girl shtick.

A Place Further Than the Universe—  As much as I dislike icy roads, single-digit temperatures and having to deal with piles of snow, cold-weather tourism has a huge romantic appeal to me. I’ve read all about the Ice Hotel in Sweden, and the idea of going to Lapland, Iceland, or even Greenland, is something I think about often. Unless I get over my huge fear of flying, I’m never going to get anywhere near that whole region, but hey…there’s nothing wrong with imagining it.

I’ve never really felt a pull to go to Antarctica though. Penguins are awesome and all, but I think the fact that it’s just so remote is what renders it unappealing to me. If you go north, even pretty far to the north you’ll still find cities and towns where people live, albeit sparsely. There are no towns in Antarctica; I mean, maybe I’m mistaken, but unless I’ve missed something in the past ten years, no one goes to Antarctica and comes back raving about what great restaurants they have there. It’s something apart from human culture, like the surface of the moon.

This show is almost in my wheelhouse, since I relate to the wanting- to-go to-a-mysterious-far-away-cold-place aspect, but I’m having trouble getting psyched about the girls going to Antarctica in particular. So far it’s well-written and well-produced, with the chase scene in episode 2 a particular stand out, but I’m not completely sold yet. I think the test of whether this show succeeds will be if I start to find the idea of going to Antarctica exciting myself, instead of just wishing the show was about a group of girls going to northern Finland.

Ms. Koizumi Loves Ramen Noodles  This sounds like a bad idea on paper: a Food Wars!-like show that features people having foodgasms, except they can only eat one type of food. Why would you do that? Why would you make a food porn show based on only one food, and make it a full-length, 12-episode series no less? This seems like the kind of thing that might work as a 3-minute short, if that.

The first episode was pretty dull, but after the second, I think I might be on board Ms. Koizumi’s little train here, perhaps against my better judgment. The characters are better defined than they usually are in this type of show, and there’s more nuance to the world of ramen than noodle-neophytes might think. At first I couldn’t imagine how they were going to get 12 whole episodes out of this concept, but now? I think I get it. The show is trying to do something pretty simple (decent character interaction +constant ramen facts!), but what it sets out to do, it succeeds at…I think? Maybe I’m just giving it a pass because I’m hungry.

Who am I kidding? I’m a vegan now and the only way I get to enjoy meat is when I watch anime characters eat it, so I’m going to watch all 12 episodes of Koizumi stuffing her face with pork-and-chorizo ramen, then I’m going to watch it all again. If you can actually eat ramen in real life, you probably have little use for this show (and I’m trying very hard not to hate you right now), so keep that in mind.

Dagashi Kashi 2— Speaking of food shows that shouldn’t work, here we have a second season of Dagashi Kashi, the show about cheap candy and snacks that usually don’t look very appetizing. At least the Japanese audience has nostalgia for these products, but for foreigners, we lack that powerful childhood connection. In theory, the show doesn’t have much to offer the international audience.

And yet, I found the first season of this show absolutely delightful two years ago. Maybe it’s the characters; maybe it’s the fact that I want to live in a world where penny candy could possibly make anyone this happy. For whatever reason, they could probably make  12 seasons of Dagashi Kashi and I’d be cool with it. I was a little concerned with the change to half-length episode format, but if anything, cutting down the running time seems to have improved matters; they have just enough time to freak out over the latest fried octopus flavored gobstopper or whatever, then it’s on to the next thing.

I feel like I should have some sort of comment on the change to Hotaru’s design, but honestly? Unless I’m looking at screenshots side-by-side, I can’t tell the difference. So sue me.

The Ryou’s Work is Never Done!It has to take a certain amount of chutzpah to put out another show about shogi during the same season as March Comes In Like A Lion, right? I mean, let’s face it, even if Ryou does really well for itself, it’s always going to be “that other anime about shogi with cute girls in it.”

Right now though, anything else the show might have to offer is overshadowed by the 4497th incidence of the Loli Controversy: the show has a young girl in it who is sometimes depicted with non-detailed nudity, and even though no real children are involved isn’t this just edging dangerous close to child porn, blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Don’t get me wrong, I think there’s something worth discussing in there somewhere, but this happens so often that the fact that it’s even a controversy anymore is kind of strange to me.

Hey, speaking of lolis, who else remembers the original Lolita, a.k.a. Dolores Haze, lust object of one Humbert Humbert? And how the genius of Lolita is, even though a child is raped every day from the age of 10 onwards, the reader is seduced by Humbert to some degree, and thus is made to feel somewhat complicit in Lo’s situation? So that, at the end of the book, while you’d like to just write off HH as a total monster that you have zero sympathy for, you just can’t, and that opens up a Pandora’s box of uncomfortable questions?

I’m not trying to argue that this show, or any of its contemporaries are on an artistic par with Lolita; that’s ridiculous, and also not the point. The point is, we have all these shows with “lolis” in them, named after a character in the most deliberately, brilliantly offensive and disturbing book of all time, and people are still complaining that these “loli”-themed shows make them uncomfortable. Shall we also complain that swimming pools are too wet, deserts too dry, Godiva truffles too chocolatey?

I don’t plan to continue watching this show, since Lion provides all the hot shogi-explaining action a girl could possibly need. But I find the dialogue surrounding it kind of sad, and it’s only going to get worse once they do a beach episode or something. Get ready for “But real 9-year-old-girls wear bathing suits just like one Ai was wearing all the time!” “Yeah but that DOESN’T MAKE IT RIGHT!” and so on and so forth. Ack.

Slow Start— This is an interesting experiment in just how minimal an anime premise can be before it ceases to have any premise at all beyond “cute girls are friends.” The hook here is that the main character missed her high school entrance exam and had to take it the next year, so she’s secretly one year older than everyone else in her grade. She’s trying to hide it, but considering that this is perhaps the least juicy dark secret anyone could possibly have, it’s hard to feel invested in what’s going to happen if anyone finds out.

It’s not bad; if you find it soothing to watch cute girls eat boxed lunches and do sports and stuff, this show has that. There’s some humor, and some maybe-they’re-really-lesbians teasing. The animation is above-average, at least so far. It’s just that there’s really no reason to recommend this show over pretty much any other show that features girls in a school setting. Three Leaves, Three Colors didn’t really have much of a premise beyond “girls are friends,” but made up for it with characters who were really fun to watch. I don’t think Slow Start has that, which is a bit of a shame.

How to Keep A Mummy I had no idea this show existed until I saw it on Crunchyroll, and I’m glad I fell over it. It’s about a tiny little mummy creature who’s incredibly cute, and you just want to go “awwww!” and hug him about 100 times in the first episode. It’s possible this trick will get old, but I’m a sucker for tiny little cute things and will probably keep saying “awww!” throughout the entire season.

However, based on the OP, there will be more monster characters, so the show should have a lot more going on than just cuteness appeal. I would say moe appeal, except Mii-kun barely even has eyes, and I’m not sure if it counts as moe without big eyes. I need the International Moe Council to revise their guidelines on this.


So, what do you guys think of these seasonal posts that cover a whole bunch of anime at once? I know that for SEO purposes, I’d be much better off doing a separate post for each show, but never in my life have I done anything that’s good for SEO; why start now?

Okay, I shouldn’t joke about that, MAYBE doing things to improve the visibility of my blog would be good, but for now, I like my stupidly impractical 2000-word posts. Life is hard, let me please have this one thing?

What’s the Point of Aniblogging, Anyway?

I realize the question I’ve posed above has a very simple answer: there is no point to anime blogging; there is no point to anime, for that matter. In fact, we are only primitive water-based lifeforms clinging desperately to a piece of spinning rock in space, and ultimately, nothing matters. Now that we’ve covered the ultimate answer, which I see as a matter of doing my due diligence, let’s move on to something worth talking about, because the ultimate/existential answer happens to be really boring.

Seriously, why do we blog about anime? To entertain? To some extent that’s true, but then you run into the problem that certain kind of shows lend themselves to that much better than others. I had a lot of fun blogging Wizard Barristers, which was a pretty bad show, primarily because it was a mess and it gave me tons of material to make fun of. I also had fun with Madhouse’s X-Men anime.* However, doing episodic blogging of a show that’s actually good is of questionable value. For a lot of shows, all you’re left doing is speculating about what’s going to happen, which is kind of pointless; it’s not like you’re going to win a prize if you’re right. And for some shows, like Girls Last Tour or even March Comes in Like a Lion, providing the kind of flippant commentary that blogging seems to lend itself to would feel downright disrespectful.

So episodic aniblogging can be entertaining, providing you’re covering a bad show that wouldn’t be worth watching on it’s own merits…meaning, it’s a format best used for shows that really shouldn’t be worth the effort in the first place. For better shows, especially shows of a more serious nature, it’s better to watch the whole show (or at least a significant chunk, like a season), and then blog about it. This produces better writing, at least in my experience, but it does feel rather limiting. So you watch a 12-episode show, about 4 hours worth of anime, and then produce maybe a 1,000 word essay. That’s it? Seems a little anti-climactic.

There’s another problem with episodic blogging, regardless of show quality, and that’s the tendency for the blogger to become a wanna-be writer; we start predicting where the story’s going to go, then get upset when it doesn’t necessarily go there. With a lot of shows I’ve written about, I’m not sure if they were disappointing because the writing wasn’t that good, or because I was irritated that the show didn’t do what I felt it was supposed to based on the hints that I thought I’d picked up on. So in this case, reading an episodic blog of a show is watching the blogger finish the story in their head, then have a gradual angry breakdown when the story reveals itself to be something entirely different. Maybe that’s fun if you have a sadistic streak, but it doesn’t seem like something we should be aiming for here.

I guess what I’m really wondering is, what are people really looking for from anime blogging, assuming they want it at all? I like it when a show first airs and people are posting all kinds of screenshots, jokes and speculation; I like the community that forms around that process. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s something tailor-made for social media and chat services; Twitter, Discord, etc. It’s a collaborative play on the show that needs multiple people to work, and not something a single blogger can do.

Well, I suppose you could do a blog about an anime and just post screenshots and jokes and silly captions, but then you’re just doing what social media does, only worse. I’d like to think that there’s still some use for the blogging format without watering it down.

I like writing about anime, and I’d like to continue doing it. I don’t think it’s pointless, even though some of the more popular models of anime blogging seem increasingly pointless to me; I think there’s a better way of doing it, and I just haven’t figured out what it is yet. I feel like there’s an obvious answer right in front of my nose, and one day I’m going to smack my forehead and yell “Aha! This is how anime blogging should work in 2018! This is what this format really has to offer!”, but that day is not today.

If you’d like to help me out, you could let me know in the comments what you enjoy about anime blogging and why. Then, if I ever discover the secret to Aniblogging 2.0, I’ll be sure to credit you in my upcoming book, “How to Justify Spending Huge Amounts of Effort on Wastes of Everyone’s Time.” It’s a working title.

*Blogging about X-Men was a little different from blogging about another bad anime because the X-Men were pretty much my first love when I was first getting into the whole geek lifestyle. I wanted that show to be good, and when it wasn’t, I enjoyed making fun of it, but it was still kind of bittersweet overall.

Fall 2017 Anime Season Wrap-Up

After a season or two of not really feeling it, I was really into anime this season. Not only did I watch a bunch of shows to completion, there were a bunch I wanted to see that I just didn’t have time for; hopefully, I’ll catch up on them soon. I promise I’ll get to you, The Ancient Magus Bride.

I wonder: was anime really good this season, and that’s what pulled me back in? Or is it an entirely cyclical thing, and my biological clock just has an “anime addict” setting that got switched on again sometime around October 2017? I guess I’ll never really know. Isn’t it cool that even when you start to get old, you still don’t understand why you do any of the things you do? Keeps life interesting, right?

Ahem, anyway, I already put down some thoughts on Recovery of an MMO Junkie, Urahara and Girl’s Last Tour over the past few weeks. Here’s a roundup of the rest of the lot.

Animegataris— What a strange animal this show turned out to be. At first, it was a show all about the experience of being a student anime fan, kind of like a poor man’s Genshiken (or a rich man’s Genshiken, if you happened to prefer these characters.). There were teases that some strange supernatural stuff was going on in the background, but it was still pretty grounded. Then in the last third, the show went super-meta and became about anime characters becoming aware of the fact that they were really anime characters, and it was just…wow. I mean, saying that the show “broke the fourth wall,” would be a massive understatement; it’s more like, there’s only the faintest sprinkling of plaster dust left somewhere near where the fourth wall once stood. That wall got fucking vaporized.

It was a fun ride, but it wasn’t exactly coherent. While the show did drop numerous hints that something odd was up from the beginning, I’m not sure that the hints dropped actually matched up with the bizarro ending that we got. It felt more like the creative team knew they wanted to do something different with the last few episodes, but didn’t decide what they were actually doing until the very last second. I definitely got the “we’re making this up as we go along” vibe at the end, and maybe that’s okay?

Still, personally I think it would have been stronger if it had all felt planned out from the beginning. I’m a stickler for Chekhov’s gun on the fireplace; in this case, there wasn’t a gun on the fireplace, there was a banana-cream muffin, then somewhere around episode nine the show goes all like “look at this MASSIVE GUN that’s been on the fireplace the whole time!” and I’m like “Shut up, you have muffin all over your face and now you just look stupid.”

Did that make any sense? No, of course it didn’t. And that, perhaps, is the genius of Anime Gataris, and why I still kind of recommend it despite the fact that it was all over the place. We just don’t get these kinds of crazy, disjointed experiences that often, in anime or otherwise– at least, not intentionally.

A Sister is All You Need— Another strange bird that had it’s moments, but didn’t quite know what it wanted to be. It did a good job of balancing the fanservice and lewd humor with some genuinely insightful and poignant moments, but I wonder if it really went far enough in either direction. Despite the frequent fanservice, I don’t think the show wasn’t really ero enough to appeal to the audience who were watching it primarily for that reason, and the emotionally resonant moments, while powerful individually, didn’t seem to amount to much by the end of the show.

The ending did provide some closure, but not enough to make the experience feel complete at 12 episodes. It was a “here’s juuuuuust enough closure so you’re not pissed as hell at the writers, but we sure hope we get a second season!” kind of ending.

At the beginning of the season, I was hoping that this show would break down the trend of little sister fetishism and explore why some otaku develop this particular obsession, rather than just reveling in it, and to be fair, I think the show really did start to do that. It just feels like they went about halfway there and then ran out of episodes. I’m torn between wanting a second season so they can finish the job, and feeling like they actually had enough time to do it in 12 episodes and shouldn’t have wasted so much time on filler.

All that said, if you’re a writer at any level, this show is worth watching for how spot-on it is about writers and all their various insecurities. That’s one thing this show did better than perhaps any other anime I’ve seen, and that’s kind of impressive for a show that so many people wrote off completely based on its first episode.

Blend S— This started out really fun, but it seemed like the creative team didn’t know how to fully take advantage of the premise. About halfway through the show the characters started taking frequent field trips to anywhere but the cafe, which felt like a waste, since all the funniest stuff always happened at the shop. In theory, they could have gotten a lot more jokes out of Maika’s “accidental sadist” character, as well as the other waitresses’ quirks, but it seemed like the writers just ran out of ideas way too early.

I know there was some talk about the age gap between the two love interests (Maika and Dino, the manager) being too big, but honestly, I was so focused on the show’s diminishing laugh value as it went on that I hardly noticed. I mean, yeah, there’s at least a 10-year age difference there and that’s generally not good, but both characters have the emotional maturity of a wet sponge, so does it really matter much in this case? I’m having trouble worrying too much about poor, innocent Maika, demon-faced scion of aristocrat millionaires, being taken advantage of by the world’s most clueless small business owner.

Some fans really liked this one and are hoping for a second season, and judging on how popular memes and fanart for this show were online, it seems like there might be enough demand for another round of Blend S. If they do make more, I hope they take copious notes from Wagnaria and make better use of the cafe setting instead of trying to run away from it. Because if we get another season that was like the second half of this one, that sounds so boring that even I might skip it…and you know how I feel about shows that take place in coffee shops.

Food Wars: The Third Plate— Perhaps the last thing I expected from this show was for it to get political, but it just goes to show that you should never underestimate everyone’s favorite show about panty shots and experimental gastronomy. Things in foodgasm-land have gotten so political, I almost wrote a post called “How Food Wars! Predicted Trump’s America,” but then decided to hold back. Because whenever I do something like that, people take it deadly seriously for about three years, and then eventually someone will drop by and leave a comment saying “Lol, nice parody,” and I’ll know that at least one person got it.

The show has gotten political in a pretty ridiculous way, considering that the main villain’s plan seems to involve turning the school into some sort of authoritarian cuisine factory, where individual goals and creativity mean nothing and all that matters is stamping out identical portions of fancy-pants gourmet food. Main villain also seems to have plans of destroying all the restaurants in the world that are not fine dining establishment, which is, err…do economics exist in Food Wars? Because I see several practical problems with that, problems which should be obvious even to an evil chef demagogue.

For some people, the show has gotten too ridiculous to be taken remotely seriously, but honestly, this show was always so inherently ridiculous to me that I don’t feel like much has changed. Now instead of the Totsuki Academy-brand of meritocracy where 90% of the student population washes out, we’re seeing the other end of the spectrum, where there can be no meritocracy because everyone is forced to be identical. I assume we’re eventually going to end somewhere comfortably in the middle, which seems like a good long-term plan for the series.

Even if the show has completely jumped off the deep end though, would it matter? This is Food Wars!, the show where a really delicious meat bun can blow your pants off. All I really ask from this show is food porn, which it delivers in spades, and just enough reason to care about the characters that I don’t feel guilty for only watching for the food porn. Right now, this show is holding up it’s end of the contract, no matter how insane Erina’s psycho Dad turns out to be.

Konohana Kitan— I got really bored with this somewhere around the middle of episode 4 and dropped it. I’m still kind of curious if it was doing the whole episodic occult show thing, or it ultimately veered closer to a slice-of-life show that just happened to contain fox-eared girls and other supernatural critters, but not curious enough to actually watch more of it. If anyone out there watched it all, feel free to let me know in the comments what was really going on here.

Love is Like a Cocktail— Thanks to Chi’s amazing bust, this was the stealth fanservice hit of the season. Yes, it was a little 3-minute short that was primarily about mixed drinks, but do you really think people were watching for the recipes?

I feel like they could have done more with this, but that seems almost unfair to demand of a 3 minute show with a simple premise. Then again, I Can’t Understand What My Husband is Saying is in the same category yet seemed to make better use of its limited run time. In any case, if you haven’t seen it, it will only take a half an hour or so to watch the whole thing, so if you like booze (or boobs, or some combination thereof), you might as well.

Ame-Con!— I have tried to love Rainy Color/Rainy Cocoa and its spinoffs, and I just can’t do it. I don’t know if this show just doesn’t work as a 2-minute short, or if there’s no length that would work here, but something is just missing from this show. Even for someone like me who basically has a fetish for anime about brewing coffee, this show is just boring; I have no idea how they pulled that off, but it’s kind of perversely impressive. This may be the only coffee-shop anime that does nothing for me.