Thoughts on America’s Greatest Otaku: Episode #1

I wasn't too into this show, but then there was a lady dressed as Sailor Venus with wings and it was all good. Anybody can dress as Sailor Moon with wings, but it's rare for Minako to get the angel wings she deserves.

Just so you know, the last reality show I watched was an episode of Top Chef where Cookie Monster, Elmo and Telly showed up to judge a baking Quickfire, and Padma totally talked to the Muppets like they were real people. For me, this was the pinnacle of reality television; they can stop making it now.

Nevertheless, I decided to give Tokyopop’s new reality show (or whatever it is) a shot, and while it certainly wasn’t stellar- five minutes in, I was considering turning it off out of boredom- it was better than I expected. I decided that I wouldn’t blog about it if it was really bad, because then all I’d end up doing is mocking the show, and that’s kind of a horrible thing to do when real people are involved. It turned out that it’s good enough that I can talk about it without mocking it, but not good enough that I’m not tempted to at points.

Otaku Who?

Right now, the biggest problem with the show is that the so-called “Otaku 6” have no personality, other than perhaps Stephan. That’s not to say they don’t actually have good personalities; maybe if I knew them, I would think they were the most charming, sparklingly effervescent otaku shut-in con-goers I knew, but that’s the problem- I don’t know them. At all.

I used to snobbily avoid all reality TV, but lately I’ve softened to some of the shows that have actual content other than “watch these people live in a house.” After watching many episodes of Top Chef, Cake Boss, and Next Great Baker (notice a theme?), I know that the one thing you can usually say about reality shows is that you get a strong feeling of the personalities of the various contestants- sometimes, you hate their guts, but you definitely know who they are, even after only an episode or two. The main thing the Otaku 6 did in this episode was stand around and try not to look too awkward when host (and Tpop founder) Stu Levy asked their guests questions. What’s the point of having them, if we’re not getting to know them?

Of course, the Otaku 6 aren’t the contestants- the four people in this episode who are in contention for the “Greatest Otaku” title are, and the interviews with them were actually interesting. Supposedly, the Otaku 6 are going to come into their own next episode and start doing more interviews, but I don’t know- as of right now, I would be having pretty much the same experience if Levy were just walking around and interviewing people single-handedly.

Also, the five or ten minutes at the beginning of the show spent introducing the 6 were by far the most boring part- I almost turned it off in a until they started interviewing the guy with the massive toy collection. Speaking of which…

I want this Sailor Moon figure this guy has so badly...and thanks to this show, I now KNOW WHERE HE LIVES.

A Definition of Otaku After My Own Heart

They seem to be using a rather inclusive definition of otaku- one contestant’s American comics collection is counted as part of his otaku swag, and some of the venues aren’t strictly Japanese or J-culture related; I couldn’t figure out what the otaku connection with that game company was, other than the fact that the art in their games was MAYBE a little anime-inspired.

This doesn’t bother me- the girl who puts Tomb Raider analysis on her otaku blog- but expect J-culture snobs to bitch and moan about this like there’s no tomorrow. At the very least, I promise that if I stop watching it, it will be for a much less stupid reason.

Chance of anyone watching this not knowing what "Jpop" means: .0000000001%. It's like the Oni system (and I bet you're such an otaku you got that reference too.)

Split Focus

The last thing of note is the fact that the show seems to be somewhat ambivalent about whom it’s targeted at. Every otaku-related term is described in an on-screen post it, which I suppose is nice for people who don’t know squat about otaku culture, but how many of them are actually watching this? Furthermore, how many people who know about this show really need WoW explained as “a popular online role-playing game”?

If it was just the post-its I could let it slide, but it seems like everything is over-explained just on the off chance that someone grew up in some wasteland where even Pickachu’s adorable face never graced their TV screens, and it’s annoying. I thought this was supposed to be a show by-otaku, for otaku, at least in theory- why are they catering to the 1% who discovered this site through something other than an enthusiast website?

Best: -The interviews with all four of the Greatest Otaku hopefuls. Not only was it fun seeing those massive collections, but they seem to have tried to pick people who have some kind of talent in addition to just buying everything under the sun.

-That little moment when Levy picked up that girl’s Nia dolfie, and though she was smiling you could tell she was thinking “if he breaks my $700 doll I will absolutely set the Tokyopop offices on fire.”

Part of me is almost sorry that he didn't just drop it, just to see what would have happened. Does that make me a terrible person?

Worst: The really poor play-acting Levy and the guys did a few times. If you’re going to do an obviously rehearsed “hey, what are THESE doing here?” sort of bit, you have to go so far over the top that it’s hilariously cheesy, not just kind of throw it out there and hope for the best. Those were perhaps the only moments when the show started to cross the line into “I can’t believe I’m watching this” territory.

Overall, it was definitely not a total waste of 40 minutes of my life. But would I bother if I didn’t have a blog called Otakusphere? I’m really not sure at this point, but I’ll give it another episode or two at least.

Tomb Raider, Level 6: The Coliseum

Screenshots for this level taken from TombRaiderChronicles.com, since Katie's TR site doesn't have screens from this level for some reason.

Because Greece and Rome are Clearly Right Next to Each Other

On some level, I always assumed that the reason there was a coliseum at this point was because Lara had somehow passed- on foot- from Greece into Rome. Now in my regular, non-Tomb Raider life, I’m well aware of the fact that Greece and Rome are not within easy walking distance, but it never bothered me until I came back to this game for this project. Somehow, while playing Tomb Raider, my brain has protected me all this time from the crushing tyranny of geography.

The official Prima strategy guide tries to play it both ways: “Here’s a real treat! A Greek Coliseum complete with maniac lions roaming around.” No, strategy guide, we know coliseums are not Greek; don’t try to be clever (although in fairness, the guide does point out a major shortcut in this level, so maybe it is a bit clever.)

There's a lot of fighting to be had, but that's pretty much neutral as far as I'm concerned. Shooting the lions and gorillas in the middle of the coliseum from the stands is fun, in a totally unfair, shooting-fish-in-a-barrel sort of way.

I think I must have played this level about ten times over the past week or so while trying to figure out what I was going to say about it. It’s another one of those levels that people tend to remember, but I’m honestly not sure how much I like it; once you’ve reached the main section of the level and have that “oh cool, it’s a coliseum,” moment, the level empties its bag of tricks rather quickly. The traps are fairly pedestrian, running around the “stands” gets repetitive (and disappointing, due to an inexplicable lack of pick-ups there), and it’s actually one of the more simplistic levels in the game.

Part of the problem here is probably me, since the concept of a coliseum doesn’t speak to my imagination as much as a lot of the other concepts in the game do- I never bothered to see Gladiator, and never really had much of an interest in Roman culture, period. I think some people probably played this level soaking up the atmosphere, thinking what it must have been like to live in Roman times and watch actual gladiators battle actual lions for their actual larynges, but my mind doesn’t tend to go in that direction, and that’s really not the game’s fault.

There's a shortcut to the lower balcony here- you can backflip onto the rock, jump forward and grab the ledge. It requires such precise placement that it's not really much of a shortcut, although I still feel awfully proud of myself when I pull it off.

All that said, this level does have some rather interesting touches. They totally fake you out with the ending- it seems so obvious that the goal of the level must be to get through the giant double doors on the balcony, since, like trained seals, by this point we have learned to associate large doors with progression. It’s actually kind of a surprise when the level ends with Lara underwater.

We also get a save crystal about one minute before the end of the level (behind the aforementioned double doors), which is quite odd. In theory, you could die in the underwater passage before you complete the level, so the crystal isn’t entirely useless, but it still seems out of place.

Stupid Pierre Tricks

On the plus side, for people who enjoy messing around with Pierre (and I hope that includes you and everyone you know), this level happens to be a particularly fun place to play around with his wacky disappearing-mechanics. Since the stands of the coliseum are long straight-aways, Pierre can have a hard time finding a decent corner to slip behind for his ninja routine, and as a result, spends a tremendous amount of time getting shot. I think I shot at him once for five minutes straight.

Interestingly, he will often run far away from Lara, and then loop around back for some more punishment- as though he suddenly decided “No, I’m not going to be a sissy-man and run away, but rather be an HOMME about this and finish off ma petite* once and for all! ,” then changes his mind again sixty rounds later.

I think if you keep him out and about long enough, he will basically teleport away from you- at one point, the camera angle changed when Lara rolled, and by the time I reoriented the camera, he was gone. Poof. Bam. Like Nightcrawler or something.

Based on this indisputable in-game evidence, I have now concluded that Pierre Dupont is a  sorcerer.

If you have another explanation, hey, knock yourself out.

It is now my intention to gather more evidence to back up this exciting new theory in the realm of Tomb Raider scholarship.

Best: It’s really satisfying the first time you get to the elevated room with the chaise lounges, I mean the Emperor’s Balcony, according to the strategy guide. Climbing on the rocks to get to the balcony is fun in that Lost Valley I-love-jumping-on-stuff way, and it’s just cool looking out at the expanse of the coliseum once you’ve ascended.

Worst: The first minute or so of the level is boring. You might be thinking “hey, it’s the FIRST ROOM, why be so harsh?” but think about it: we just did HOW MUCH work to open that door in the bowels of St. Francis Folly? I don’t know about you, but I was expecting more from the other side of that uber-defended door than a room full of sand and a disoriented crocodile. Plus, I find the lack of pick-ups in the stands area to be truly disappointing.

Rating: Three Uzi Clips Out of Five. The idea of the coliseum, geographic switcheroo aside, is probably great, but the execution could have been better as far as I’m concerned.

Next up: Palace Midas, or I no longer care about the whole Greece/Rome mix-up because OMG SHINY THINGS!

*Yes, all of my knowledge of French comes from Gambit of the X-Men. Why do you ask?

Edit: I just realized that Katie’s TR Screenshots DOES have screens of this level, I just missed them- considering I’m working on Palace Midas now I think I’m going to let it slide, however.

Parasite Eve Playthrough, Part 1

I confess: I love Parasite Eve. Objectively, I’m not even sure it’s that good.

But some things are deeply influential to a specific individual, and it’s not because they’re great –quality has nothing to do with it. It’s a certain alchemy of personality, timing, and some x-factor that I’ll never be able to nail down. Parasite Eve was one of the first games I played, and it had a huge effect on my personal aesthetics.

Come to think of it, between this and Tomb Raider, I seem to have a thing for games featuring young women spelunking in dark places. What does this say about me? That I wish I was a spelunker? Where does one go to spelunk these days?

Keep in mind, I’m not encouraging everyone to go out and pick up a copy of the game. PS1 games from that era have aged poorly in the graphics department, and while I think the writing in PE is actually underrated, there’s nothing about it that’s sufficiently high quality to make it especially worth playing compared to more recent fare. However, as a startlingly ambitious combination of cop show, psychological thriller, Doctor Who-esque Science Fantasy, dungeon crawling, character building, gun collecting, and techno music put together in an RPG that celebrates an empty Manhattan that never was, it’s a unique piece of gaming history.

The protagonist of Parasite Eve is rookie NYC cop Aya Brea, proficient with every firearm under the sun and totally the women I’d fall for if I played on the other team (and err, if she weren’t fictional I suppose. I sometimes forget that part.) However, I’m straight, and it does have to be said that Aya can be a little dense– her dialogue is littered with exclamations like “What? How can that be!?” and “No!” and “What do you mean my mitochondria are evolving at an unusually accelerated rate?” People have knocked the character for that, but to be fair, I kind of like that about her. We can’t all be Rhodes Scholars. She’s already gorgeous, can handle a rifle as well as Solid Snake, and soon enough, will also have superpowers. There’s a fine line between idealized and insufferable, you know?

This hilariously awful date is probably much more hilarious if you happen to be a woman and have had this experience.

Note on the Screens: In years past I have always, always kept the default character names in RPGs out of respect for the writers’ intentions, but in some of the following screens you will see that Aya’s name is Karen for this playthrough. Is this an attempt to tag all of my screens so they aren’t easily stolen, or a sign of my growing megalomania? You decide.

The game starts with Aya on a hilariously awful date, with an escort who says things like “I had my Dad get me the best seats for us tonight!” Y’know, I wonder how much the average guy gamer likes this opening, because being a woman probably makes it about ten thousand times better. It’s like, we’ve all been on this date, but unfortunately unlike Aya, we weren’t packing heat…well, actually I was once, but that’s a story best left for another day.

Fortunately possessed Opera Singer Melissa (known from this point on as Eve) brings a

You know, maybe this is just sour grapes because I never got the hang of playing the violin, but I would be totally cool with it if more games opened with Carnegie Hall being set on fire.

premature end to Aya’s date by lighting Carnegie Hall on fire. I used to just pretend that I had cramps.

While the other occupants of the theater are busy burning to death, Aya’s all business; she draws her gun and orders her mysteriously-not-burning date out of the theater. If I were some kind of fancy internet guru, I would make an animation of Aya body-checking her date out of the way, because that’s exactly what she does here. Minor plot hole: It’s repeated many times that Aya is the sole survivor of the Carnegie Hall Incident, only her boyfriend mysteriously escapes the theater and is never mentioned again. I guess some of her special mitochondria must have rubbed off on him when he was helping her off with her coat.

I can't help but feel that Aya is kind of happy to have a reason to get rid of her date prematurely, carnage or not.

Aya approaches Eve in the name of the NYPD, and Eve starts starts demonstrating some of the problems with Japanese-to-English translation that plague this game. The Japanese use the word “body” much more often than English speakers, but a too-literal translation will often keep the word, leading to awkwardness. “I’m burning up!” has a very different connotation then “My body is getting HOT!” Guess which version this game goes with.

Localization Team: I BLAME YOU.

A pathetically easy boss fight ensues, during which Aya’s “Parasite Energy” awakens due to her proximity to Eve, meaning she has a green PE bar under her health from now on and will start learning spells to cast as she levels up. Technically I guess they’re not “spells”, they’re more like “benevolent mutations” or “super-evolved mitochondrial abilities”, but I’m going to use the word spell from now on because it’s shorter. Anyway, Eve babbles something about a connection between her and Aya (Nooo? REALLY?), and Aya has the first of about forty flashbacks to a time she was in the hospital as a small child that she barely remembers. Eve floats offstage, and Aya follows.

At this point, the story sequences start to dwindle and you begin to experience the actual gameplay of PE–in the past kiddies, opening non-playable sequences used to last for about five minutes as opposed to three hours– which I will save for the next installment. The main event is that Aya starts ransacking the basement of Carnegie Hall while looking for Eve, and mysteriously finds lots of ammo instead. Illogical perhaps, but I kind of like the idea that all of the musicians who perform at Carnegie Hall have been stockpiling bullets just in case that first-chair violinist needs to be put in their place….actually, that’s not as far from the truth as you might at first think.

Next time on Parasite Eve: Spelunking in the rat-infested sewers beneath Carnegie Hall is no reason not to look fabulous. In the interests of full disclosure my next blog entry will probably be another installment of the Tomb Raider project, but you know what I mean.

(Note: Just like the Tomb Raider Project, this was originally posted as a Destructoid Cblog; I am moving my game playthroughs over here for posterity. These entries are edited slightly differently than they were in their first posting.)

Puella Magi Madoka Magica Episode 5 Thoughts

I roughed out a concept for Sayaka preparing to do her own version of "Unlimited Blade Works", but decided not to do a finished piece. I kind of like it as a rough sketch, though.

Well, Puella Magi Madoka Magica has moved up in the hierarchy from “Things I might want to mention once and a while,” to “things I must blog about NAO!”

I figured I’d just jot down a few of my thoughts and questions about the show at this juncture, rather than recap it. Well, okay, here’s your recap: Two magical girls fought. Kyoko is a bitch. There, done. Needless to say, spoilers abound.

Thoughts on Episode #5:

1.I’m glad Sayaka has regenerative powers- leads me to believe that they’re not looking to bump her off so quickly; I don’t think I could handle losing another sympathetic character at this point. However, nothing seems to be off-limits with this show, so who knows.

2. I was really confused by what Homura’s power seemed to be, until @Rangoric pointed out that it seemed to be like the property of Gae Bolg in Fate/Stay Night: An inversion of cause and effect. Everything somehow misses Homura, because the effect of her power is that everything will miss her. I thought after her battle in episode #3 (against Charlotte) that she had some sort of weird displacement thing going on, but his explanation makes a lot more sense to me. It really makes me wonder how she’s going to handle fighting Kyoko, since it seems to be such a defensive power. How can she damage her?

3. Oh, and speaking of Kyoko, I know I’m like, SUPPOSED to hate her, but uh…yeah, mission accomplished there, guys. Why can’t a witch come and eat HER head?

Of course, with this show, I should be careful what I wish for- they’ll probably only kill her off after they’ve done some huge redemption arc and revealed that she was actually abused by her older brother at a young age, leading to her callous attitude, and inside she’s the sweetest little girl there is. Dammit.

4. I’m surprised no one on the show has even mentioned the possibility of bringing Mami back through wishing. I know a lot of fans were pleased that the series didn’t immediately go that route, but it seems odd that it wouldn’t occur to Madoka. I don’t think Madoka will use her wish to bring Mami back, because I’m pretty sure she’s going to use her wish in a more interesting way, but I wouldn’t be surprised if someone did. I may not normally be keen on characters coming back from the dead, but I’d be okay with it in this instance, since I’d trust the show to do something interesting with it.

However, the fact that Mami’s silhouette is the only one depicted sitting down in the ending leads me to believe she’s not coming back:(.

5. Speaking of wishes, what would happen if a girl wished for there to be no more witches? According to Kyubey (um, assuming he can be trusted, which is increasingly doubtful), NOTHING is off-limits for the wish. I will be a little disappointed if the series never addresses this question (or something similar), even if it’s just Kyubey pointing out the limitations on wishes he can grant; it seems like such an obvious Get-Out-of-Jail-Free card.

6. Do you think “Unlimited Blade/Musket/Whatever Works” are an inherent property of Puella Magi, or was Sayaka just doing it because she’d seen Mami do it? I had assumed it was the former, but Rangoric thinks it’s the latter- he assumed that the fact that Sayaka did an attack that was derivative of Mami’s was meant to show that she was still inexperienced, copying instead of creating her own attacks.

7. I would like to bet someone a box of Pocky that Kyubey will be revealed to be Satan, or some close associate thereof, before the end of the series.

8. At this rate, I don’t see how Madoka could possibly become a magical girl until at least episode 12 or 13, if even then. What would be a bigger subversion; if she ends the series without becoming a magical girl at all, or she becomes one, but her outfit is different than it is in the OP? Come to think of it, I honestly think giving her a completely different costume would be more of an upset to the genre. Like, “What do you mean I can’t even trust the OP?”

Tomb Raider, Level 5: St. Francis’ Folly

I have a fear of elevators in general, so Lara’s stunt in the cutscene that precedes this level has always, always freaked me out just a little. Scenes like this push her firmly over the line from “adventurous free spirit” to “batcakes insane adrenaline junkie,” and I am not keen on it. That said, I do like this cutscene overall, since it features the interesting excerpt from the monk’s journal. Like Tihocan’s epitaph later, I like the gentle reminder that people actually once lived in these places Lara explores.

I like how absorbed Lara appears to be in the book; I've always been partial to the idea that she spends most of her non-tomb raiding time reading and studying ancient languages.

I’m still confused about the line “my toes sweat at such possibilities,” though- is that supposed to be a joke, or is that something people actually say and I’ve just never come across it? I feel kind of sorry for this character we only experience in a paragraph of text: powers, beyond the creator himself, locked beneath his monastery! And all he can do is ponder the condition of his toes! Poor troubled monk, I hope he had a good, long life and spent none of his time in St. Francis’ Folly anywhere near that abysmal second secret.

Innovating Against the Clock

This level is a conundrum; on the one hand, it’s incredibly daring and inventive, but it also shows just how rushed the designers were like no other level does. First, they swap a Roman god’s name with the proper Greek one (Neptune for Poseidon), and include a Norse God, Thor, for no apparent reason. I mean, Neptune was an oversight, clearly, but THOR? If you were thinking “Greek Gods” and “Lightning,” how could you NOT think of Zeus, exactly? I’m still puzzled by that omission.

And why Neptune, Thor, Atlas, and Damocles? How arbitrary is that?

Really, monks? REALLY?

Second, the challenge rooms are mostly one-trick ponies, and of them all, only Damocles and Thor are really memorable, and Thor mostly for the wrong reasons (although the hammer trick was admittedly cute.) That said, I found the additions they made to the challenge rooms in the incarnation of this level from Tomb Raider Anniversary extraordinarily tedious, so it’s probably just as well.

I guess I feel there’s an element of wasted potential here: can you imagine if you actually had to go through a pantheon of 12 Greek Gods, each with their own trial, in an even larger vertical room? Sure, it probably would have been broken up into two or three levels, but that would have been mind-blowing. As it stands, it’s still amazing for the time, but the choice of the Gods (even aside from the mythology-switcheroos) always made it seem more like the monks just slapped together a bunch of trials than anything else. Didn’t they care about protecting the Scion?

The Case of the Disappearing Frenchman

This level is also notable for introducing Pierre Dupont, a bane to those trying to conserve health packs. Back in the day, when I incurred a lot more damage to Lara and actually needed all the health packs I picked up, Pierre’s creeping out of the woodwork and shooting at Lara several times per level was a real problem.

Now, however, I find him more interesting to mess with than anything else; there seems to be a remarkable amount of variation in terms of how many times you can shoot him before he’ll run away. I believe there is a technical amount of damage that you need to do, but if he doesn’t happen to be near a good column to disappear behind when you finish inflicting it, he’ll run around in circles like a chicken with his head cut off and soak up a ridiculous amount of bullets, to the effect of three or four times the amount of damage he’s “supposed” to take before he runs off.

I will say this for him though: at least he knows to get the drop on Lara and start shooting at her from behind, which puts him in the top 99th percentile of Tomb Raider villains, intelligence-wise. It may not have worked out for him, but at least he had the right idea.

Speaking of his Houdini act, I know that Pierre disappears as soon as he leaves your line of sight due to technical limitations, but I always thought it was kind of cool; I like the idea that Pierre is aware of all sorts of shortcuts through the level that Lara isn’t. I mean, imagine that when you play as Lara, you see everything through a kind of “Lara-filter”, meaning you’re only aware of the routes she finds. Now in theory Pierre, who won’t have access to all the same keys and whatever Lara finds, has to find his own way, and sees parts of these venues that Lara doesn’t get anywhere near.

Seriously, a cool idea for Tomb Raider Level Editor wizards: Make a Pierre’s-eye-view of

Cool thing about Pierre's verison of this level: Does NOT include Atlas room.

these levels. Same levels, but with new areas and different puzzles, and you periodically get to sneak up behind Lara and scare the daylights out of her. Actually, since he doesn’t show up in Palace Midas, you can assume he takes a completely different route and goes through, like, five additional Greco-Roman levels. I suppose you could do the same thing with Larson in Egypt, although I can’t imagine Larson figuring out very difficult puzzles.

Oh, and awesome TRLE people? While you’re at it, do the full-on Greek Pantheon version of this level I was talking about above; people will be impressed. Although lord knows what kind of trial Demeter will spawn; maybe something Harvest Moon inspired.

Secrets: The Medipack Ain’t Worth It

By the way, this level is the reason why I decided against doing an all-secrets run; I have never gotten the second secret on this level, and I think it’s evil incarnate and have no intention of doing so. I’m also not keen on the last secret of this level, which requires you to lose more than half your health.

I know some people like truly difficult secrets that you have to work for, and I can definitely understand that, but I like to be rewarded for exploration, not repeating the same ten minutes of a level over and over again, or trying a death-defying stunt. I might have a different view of these things if I was playing the PC version, however I will always think of the Playstation incarnation as the “real” version.

Best: Nothing beats when you first walk into the main room and take in the view. Also, the game is generous enough with save crystals in this level that you can afford to jump around a lot without worrying about having to repeat fifteen minutes of progress- or maybe it just seems that way to me after having experienced the relative paucity of crystals in Tomb Raider III. Also, if I may be so bold as to include several bests for this level, the gorillas are very cool- it’s really a shock when you discover that an enemy actually follows you to higher ground, and for that reason they’re actually more intimidating than many more powerful enemies.

Worst: I almost want to give worst-honors to the incredibly tedious level of Tomb Raider Anniversary that this level made possible, but that’s setting a bad precedent. The true worst aspect is the Thor puzzle which, while it can be bypassed harmlessly by doing a forward roll, appears to be a random death trap, and usually is in practice. I only found out about the forward roll trick after reading about it online, because there’s no indication of how you’re supposed to pass it. It’s especially bad since you can get nailed with it on the way back, and have to do the rest of the puzzle over again.

Rating: Four Uzi Clips out of five; it may be blasphemy to give this level anything less than full marks, since it’s one of those levels from the first game that people tend to remember, however I just don’t find it as fun to play as Lost Valley or City of Vilcabamba. Maybe it’s the prospect of falling to your death so easily, but it’s not as fun to explore. I guess I could give it a 4.5 out of 5, but what do you do with half an Uzi Clip?

Next, it’s time for the next Greek level, a Roman Coliseum-um, make that the next Greco-Roman level. I foresee issues trying to explain this.

(Screenshots in this post have been taken with permission from Katie’s Tomb Raider Screenshots.)